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Author Topic: Teaching in Turkey  (Read 3071 times)

Offline hanuel_7

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Teaching in Turkey
« on: May 10, 2011, 12:43:34 AM »
Hello,

I was offered a job in Ansan, Turkey, which is the last major city before the Syrian border. I was wondering if anyone can lend advice about teaching in Turkey either positive or negative. Thanks.  ;D

Offline Damien

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2011, 01:49:59 AM »
It depends on what you are expecting. It is in both Europe and the middle-east, but it isn't a "European" or" western" country and is almost fully Islamic. It is a different world to those who have never ventured into that region. I have lived many places and traveled a lot, but I would have a rather large culture shock going there. I had a few Turkish friends and I knew a lot of Turks in Germany. They had a mass immigration to West-Germany after WWII, because they were hurting from lack of men. There is a decent amount that speak German, but I do not know about English. All the Turks I know spoke only German. They didn't know any English, but I didn't meet them in an English speaking country.

It depends on what you want. I personally would not want to live there. I would like to visit, but I am not too fond of the middle-east region. I prefer East-Asia, North-America, and Europe. I am not saying Turkey is a bad place, it just isn't for me.
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Offline hokeypokey

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2011, 10:31:49 AM »
I've thought about it, Turkey looks interesting to me. 
Is the position to teach elementary, middle, high school, college, or "hagwon?"
My University has a position listed to teach at a Ozyegin University in Istanbul. 

Offline constantinople

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2011, 11:07:05 AM »
Turkey is a wonderful country with wonderful people. I did a summer camp in Devrek (by the Black Sea) and loved it. I would be back in a second if the pay was decent! Yes, Islam is a religion they all practice (99% I would guess) but there are also Christian churches. Turks really want to be part of the EU and so you will see that it's quite a modern country, similarly to what Korea is to Asia, I would say. Of course there are areas that one shouldn't frequent because of the conflicts.

Just don't bring up Armenia and you'll be okay ;)
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Offline dsca0421

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2011, 04:59:12 PM »
This sounds like an interesting experience.

How did you come to this job offer? What sort of qualifications does one need to apply?

Offline leabea87

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2011, 05:25:01 PM »
My favorite college professor was born and raised in Turkey! I remember her saying that the teaching profession is associated with high status in their society. They will treat you well, I'm sure! Do it!

Offline MattHatter

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2011, 05:50:11 PM »
Did you find it on eslcafe? I was looking at turkey, but I couldn't find out how good the wage:cost of living ratio was..

Offline jongshil1

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2011, 05:50:25 PM »
I've never beeen to Turkey but it seems like a wonderful place

Offline kiwikimchi

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2011, 06:15:32 PM »
For a full time 6 day 40+hour week teaching job the typical salary is $900-$1200 USD per month. No flights, no housing allowance (even though they say they will. Uni's usually do though.) Despite what they say they will not give you a work visa/permit so 99% of the time teachers work illegially on a tourist visa and have to leave the country every 3 months. All this applies to language schools (turkish version of hakwons).

Typical students don't want to learn and couldn't care less about English. Your boss will take the word of the students over you and if you refuse to work more hours or don't come in to work to cover a shift at late notice you could be fired. Pay is often late or not all of it is paid.

Because you are working illegally the contract is  worthless. Good in the fact that if you do land a crap job you can run.

So if you fancy working your arse to the bone 6 days a week for dismial pay and bad working conditions go ahead. But don't expect to save a dime.

There ARE some good reliable jobs in Turkey but it takes time to find them.

University jobs are the best bet but hard to come by.

Currently foreigners can't work in public shools.

Thats my 2 Lira

Offline Yu_Bumsuk

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2011, 06:37:52 PM »
My cousin did it for a year and hated it. He said he'd never teach there again. He's taught in five countries.

Offline solaris326

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2011, 05:43:47 AM »
Just read this article today, about what seems to be a new program starting up in Turkey to improve English education.  Seems like it may be worth keeping an eye on as it evolves......

http://www.todayszaman.com/news-239130-turkey-to-hire-40000-native-english-speakers-as-guest-teachers.html


Offline londone7

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2011, 06:32:50 PM »
thanks for the above link, i would definately be interested in turkey if a similar program like epik/jet or decent pay was available. i'm already getting email alerts from seriousteachers.com but most of the turkey positions are about $900-$1200, shared apartment, and kindergarden level.

i've backpacked turkey twice from istanbul and all down the aegean coastline. in the tourist areas along the coast they speak english, dutch, german, french due to tourism. there are many budget european airlines that fly direct to izmir/bodrum/antalya and lots of foreigners have holiday homes there, so you can catch flights the opposite way if you want to visit europe too. many people in istanbul speak english. in the interior you'll have a harder time but thats no different from small town korea.

not all turks are strict muslim. local turkish alcohol is widely available and big towns/cities are more liberal. its a great country to visit, very safe, and friendly people. i dont know what working conditions are like but you'd take that risk in most places anyway

Offline kiwikimchi

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #12 on: September 29, 2011, 01:13:36 PM »
That new English program has failed to get off the ground. Some think it was never ment to ever happen, that it was just PR before the elections earlier in the year.

I would be in Turkey in a flash if a program like EPIK was in Turkey.

Offline JeremyMartin

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Re: Teaching in Turkey
« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2012, 03:30:02 PM »
I worked there for a year, it was my first english teaching job so it was useful in that regard. As to the illegal, yes almost everybody who works there is doing it illegally. The schools bribe the police to keep their teachers from getting grabbed.
definately check out for other teachers reports of that school (and make sure they are the teachers not the owners spreading false ones) and judge it based on that. However you do it you will neede to be flexible as you will not really have a leg to stand on.

 

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