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Author Topic: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]  (Read 28211 times)

Offline leo fuchigami

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Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« on: September 09, 2011, 12:56:17 PM »
Click HERE for lesson description and download~

Note: I've decided to host all of my lessons on my own private server. They're free and all accessible in one neat place, no strings attached!

If you like this lesson, check out my other lessons:
Strange Food
Pictures That Changed The World
Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs
PRANKS
ZOMBIES
Extreme Sports
What is Beauty?
Konglish
Big, Bigger & Biggest Animals
Education
Older Lessons
« Last Edit: November 21, 2011, 01:38:09 AM by leo fuchigami »
Konglish Jokes Video: http://youtu.be/-7KrPbV5n70
Konglish Jokes Part 2: http://youtu.be/GvRDOmLfiq0
Themed Cafes in Hongdae: http://youtu.be/yCleWUn1ACA

Offline Jimjam

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2011, 06:44:08 PM »
thanks for this I was looking for a warmer for jobs, and this is perfect! I'm going to use the video and questions and will probably use the rest of the presentation in the next lesson. Thanks!

Offline nicmic

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2011, 08:35:07 PM »
Wow, thanks for this!! I was looking for something to shock and wow the kids this week, and you just helped me out majorly!!

Offline dachiza727

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2011, 11:19:57 PM »
hi again leo,

i know i sound like a broken record, but could you attach the video also??? 

thanks man!
chad
"Iíll have a vanilla...one of those vanilla bullshit things. You know, whatever you want, some vanilla bullshit latte cappa thing. Whatever you got."

true dat.

Offline leo fuchigami

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2011, 12:51:11 AM »
hi again leo,

i know i sound like a broken record, but could you attach the video also??? 

thanks man!
chad

np~
Konglish Jokes Video: http://youtu.be/-7KrPbV5n70
Konglish Jokes Part 2: http://youtu.be/GvRDOmLfiq0
Themed Cafes in Hongdae: http://youtu.be/yCleWUn1ACA

Offline leo fuchigami

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2011, 01:01:46 AM »
Also, has anyone here ever lived in Western Germany or the Netherlands? How can they make as much money as Americans and work 2/3 the number of hours (compared to Koreans, they work half as many hours and earn 2x as much  :o)? Also, I'm assuming wealth distribution is far more equal so the average person is actually richer in these nations. It's really hard to argue with the welfare state argument when you look at statistics like this...Do they have as much disposable income? I mean, these countries clearly have superior public services (education, insurance, health, etc.), but does that come at the cost of disposable income? 
Konglish Jokes Video: http://youtu.be/-7KrPbV5n70
Konglish Jokes Part 2: http://youtu.be/GvRDOmLfiq0
Themed Cafes in Hongdae: http://youtu.be/yCleWUn1ACA

portlandzach

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2011, 09:01:35 AM »
Thank you so much for sharing this! :)

portlandzach

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2011, 09:08:40 AM »
also, could you post a link for the video you showed to your class.  I am curious what specific video you are using. thanks :)

Offline pcunit2009

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2011, 12:44:30 PM »
Quote
It's really hard to argue with the welfare state argument when you look at statistics like this...Do they have as much disposable income?

Most people who live in a welfare state will tell you there is no reasonable moral argument against the welfare state. In England, I vote conservative. In America, I'd probably be called a socialist. :D

I don't know if you've seen "Sicko" by Micheal Moore (I know some people hate it just because its Micheal Moore) but I think a nice response to this is the example of the British doctor Moore visits whilst he's in London.

Quote
Michael Moore: ...so, working for the goverment, you probably have to use public transportation?
British Doctor: No, so, I have a car that I use...
Michael Moore: An old beater?
[cut to a frontal close take of the Doctor's HOT Audi parking]

He worked for the NHS, lived in a million-POUND house located in a very nice part of London, drove a very nice car and had a great quality of life.

However, he didn't have a multi-million pound house or 2-3 Audis, Mercs or Ferraris.

It depends on just how much disposable income you want I guess?

In Europe, the rich are still disgustingly rich, just generally not quite as disgustingly rich as those in Asia and the US. At the same time, there are still lot's of poor people in Europe - just not quite as poor (generally speaking) as the US or Asia.

It's a complicated and sensitive subject I've found, but most Europeans, Aussies and Kiwis I've met cannot comprehend how anybody could be against the welfare state.

Maybe that answers your question, maybe it doesn't. I thought I'd try and shed some light on it for you.....

Nice lesson by the way. Cheers!

Shameless self-promotion - http://plummerandchinsadventure.com/

Offline rjsinger

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2011, 01:24:33 PM »
Thanks Leo, I love your lessons and so do my students. Please keep posting!

Offline PsychoGemini

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2011, 06:16:44 PM »
Your lessons are always spot-on!  Thank you Leo for all your hard work!  The salaries for the jobs really threw them for a loop along with the pictures.

Offline leo fuchigami

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2011, 07:13:23 PM »
also, could you post a link for the video you showed to your class.  I am curious what specific video you are using. thanks :)

best job in the world


most dangerous job in the world - the video i uploaded is edited for time's sake. the original is almost 8 minutes long.
Konglish Jokes Video: http://youtu.be/-7KrPbV5n70
Konglish Jokes Part 2: http://youtu.be/GvRDOmLfiq0
Themed Cafes in Hongdae: http://youtu.be/yCleWUn1ACA

Offline leo fuchigami

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2011, 07:23:33 PM »
Most people who live in a welfare state will tell you there is no reasonable moral argument against the welfare state. In England, I vote conservative. In America, I'd probably be called a socialist. :D

I don't know if you've seen "Sicko" by Micheal Moore (I know some people hate it just because its Micheal Moore) but I think a nice response to this is the example of the British doctor Moore visits whilst he's in London.

Quote
Michael Moore: ...so, working for the goverment, you probably have to use public transportation?
British Doctor: No, so, I have a car that I use...
Michael Moore: An old beater?
[cut to a frontal close take of the Doctor's HOT Audi parking]

He worked for the NHS, lived in a million-POUND house located in a very nice part of London, drove a very nice car and had a great quality of life.

However, he didn't have a multi-million pound house or 2-3 Audis, Mercs or Ferraris.

It depends on just how much disposable income you want I guess?

In Europe, the rich are still disgustingly rich, just generally not quite as disgustingly rich as those in Asia and the US. At the same time, there are still lot's of poor people in Europe - just not quite as poor (generally speaking) as the US or Asia.

It's a complicated and sensitive subject I've found, but most Europeans, Aussies and Kiwis I've met cannot comprehend how anybody could be against the welfare state.

Maybe that answers your question, maybe it doesn't. I thought I'd try and shed some light on it for you.....

Nice lesson by the way. Cheers!

Thanks Daniel. Actually, I'm from Canada, so I'm in total agreeance with the welfare state ideology, but the mature welfare states in Europe seem to be a step above.

Regarding disposable income: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_per_capita_personal_income
It seems Americans do indeed have a lot more, but the countries I listed are not far off. There really doesn't seem to be an argument against it unless you're filthy rich...

I really want to go to Europe one day to see the lifestyle there first hand.
Konglish Jokes Video: http://youtu.be/-7KrPbV5n70
Konglish Jokes Part 2: http://youtu.be/GvRDOmLfiq0
Themed Cafes in Hongdae: http://youtu.be/yCleWUn1ACA

Offline leo fuchigami

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2011, 07:52:52 PM »
Also, how do British perceive the Dutch? I mean, do you see them as an example of going too far left? Specifically, the legalization of prostitution, drugs, etc. I think most conservative, and even moderate Americans would probably spit in disgust. Do Europeans feel the same? Or is there a sense of inevitability or foreshadow with regard to the direction of their own policies?
Konglish Jokes Video: http://youtu.be/-7KrPbV5n70
Konglish Jokes Part 2: http://youtu.be/GvRDOmLfiq0
Themed Cafes in Hongdae: http://youtu.be/yCleWUn1ACA

Offline kitster1

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2011, 08:12:09 PM »
Absolutely fantastic lessons bro. My hats go down to you! I've become quite a popular teacher at my school thanks to your fun, compelling, and engaging lessons, such as these. Keep up the good work mate!

Offline whatisinmyhead

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2011, 11:49:07 PM »
wow, thanks again for another great lesson leo. these days when i log onto waygook i have found myself wondering if you have posted a new lesson... i'm not sure if that makes me a bad teacher or you an excellent one. probably both.

i have one question - i'm wondering how your students responded to the slide showing korean vs. american minimum wage, average salary, and whatnot. was it just simply surprise? as an american, i think i might be a little sheepish to show them that particular slide. i guess i just worry that they might mistake my desire to enlighten them about such things as some weird desire to brag about america and/or put down korea. i have found that my students generally have a very inaccurate perception of wealth in america. long story short, many of them essentially believe that the vast majority of americans are very wealthy. In one lesson in which I was talking about university life, the background of one powerpoint slide was a picture of the library at my university... upon seeing this, many students shouted, "teacher! you're house??!!". and they weren't joking. anyway, i'm just wondering how your students responded to that particular slide. of course, i could just delete it, but i have found that many times my expectations of students' knowledge/perceptions/etc. is wildly off. and, like you say, i think it is part of our duty to teach them more about cultural/worldly things than just simply english.

thanks again!
« Last Edit: September 14, 2011, 11:53:35 PM by whatisinmyhead »

Offline leo fuchigami

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #16 on: September 15, 2011, 12:53:45 AM »
wow, thanks again for another great lesson leo. these days when i log onto waygook i have found myself wondering if you have posted a new lesson... i'm not sure if that makes me a bad teacher or you an excellent one. probably both.

i have one question - i'm wondering how your students responded to the slide showing korean vs. american minimum wage, average salary, and whatnot. was it just simply surprise? as an american, i think i might be a little sheepish to show them that particular slide. i guess i just worry that they might mistake my desire to enlighten them about such things as some weird desire to brag about america and/or put down korea. i have found that my students generally have a very inaccurate perception of wealth in america. long story short, many of them essentially believe that the vast majority of americans are very wealthy. In one lesson in which I was talking about university life, the background of one powerpoint slide was a picture of the library at my university... upon seeing this, many students shouted, "teacher! you're house??!!". and they weren't joking. anyway, i'm just wondering how your students responded to that particular slide. of course, i could just delete it, but i have found that many times my expectations of students' knowledge/perceptions/etc. is wildly off. and, like you say, i think it is part of our duty to teach them more about cultural/worldly things than just simply english.

thanks again!

Thanks WIIMH.

Just to clarify though, I may make good lessons, but it doesn't mean you don't have your own strengths. I've seen other teachers create highly engaged classes with mere handouts with no PP whatsoever. This is something I have great difficulty doing. I rely quite heavily on well executed PP's to the point that I would say I'm over reliant. You could say that I developed my PP skills to compensate for my faults. Some teachers make great councillors, some teachers make great mentors, some teachers make great friends. I make great PowerPoints. And on this forum, it just happens to be the most valuable skill that can be shared. Therefore, I don't such simplistic judgements can be made from only our lesson making skills.

I had the same debate myself before creating that slide. Here's my reasoning:
Cons:
1. It's sure to fuel the USA-envy the Koreans tend to have based off only their simple knowledge of US supremacy (in whatever regard)
2. They will probably feel a sense of helplessness in knowing they're "stuck" in "poor" Korea

Pros:
1. I purposely added the slide afterwards showing the other nations at the top and bottom of the scale to neutralize the negative effect of the "how much money" slide. If you orate the countries in the list, you'll essentially get a bunch of "WTF" comments from the students. Particularly regarding nations such as Luxembourg, Qatar, UAE, Australia, Isreal, Cyprus, Slovenia and if you mention North Korea. I mean, most of these countries were probably not anywhere near where they thought they would be in the rankings.
ex: Luxembourg = almost 2.5x as rich as Americans? Australians are richer than Americans? Isreal is...rich? What is Cyprus? Qatar?!? etc.
2. If you emphasize the other extreme of the scale, the poorest countries, and basically frame it by saying "people in these countries make less money than you can make at a part-time job in one week" they'll see that Korea is in fact a "rich" country. They seemed to really enjoy finding out they make 20x more than north koreans.
3. You can break the simple concept of "America is the best" by showing how far down the scale it is in almost every metric.
For example, you can state that some European countries have minimum wages that are twice that of America's. They also work 2/3 the hours.

On this note, I've made it my personal mission to make my students envious of as many countries around the world as I can.
So far, they've been taught these extremes:
tallest men in the world = netherlands (girls love this one)
best education system = norway
richest = luxembourg
most peaceful = new zealand
happiest = costa rica (this one is highly debatable) - based off of the global happiness index
most livable city in the world = vancouver
in this way, my students now view 6 countries that are NOT america that can be defined as the "best"

anyways, I'm writing way more than I originally intended. The decision is entirely yours to make, but I hope that helped you undersatnd my thought process.
Konglish Jokes Video: http://youtu.be/-7KrPbV5n70
Konglish Jokes Part 2: http://youtu.be/GvRDOmLfiq0
Themed Cafes in Hongdae: http://youtu.be/yCleWUn1ACA

Offline leo fuchigami

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2011, 12:58:37 AM »
oh yeah, and make sure to mention how the cost of living is significantly higher in these rich countries. You can use simple formulas like "food is twice as expensive" "the cheapest apartments in NY are 500,000,000 won" "a 10 minute taxi ride costs 10,000 won" etc. They'll laugh at the ridiculousness of those figures.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2011, 01:11:21 AM by leo fuchigami »
Konglish Jokes Video: http://youtu.be/-7KrPbV5n70
Konglish Jokes Part 2: http://youtu.be/GvRDOmLfiq0
Themed Cafes in Hongdae: http://youtu.be/yCleWUn1ACA

Offline pcunit2009

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #18 on: September 15, 2011, 09:02:40 AM »
Quote
Also, how do British perceive the Dutch? I mean, do you see them as an example of going too far left? Specifically, the legalization of prostitution, drugs, etc. I think most conservative, and even moderate Americans would probably spit in disgust. Do Europeans feel the same? Or is there a sense of inevitability or foreshadow with regard to the direction of their own policies?

Personally, I love the Dutch. They are quite possibly the coolest people on the planet. We've met loads around Asia and in Europe on our travels, and they get everywhere, all speak immaculate English and are incredibly switched on and great fun. Most Brits who know Dutch people (or have visited the Netherlands - which is most Brits) would agree with this I think... The same applies to Scandinavians.

We don't see the Dutch as an example of going too far left, if anything they've had issues with the far-right in recent years (I may be wrong but if memory serves me correct I think that crazed Norweigen gunman was inspired in part by the Dutch far-right). Socially speaking, they're policies are of course very liberal. I know a lot of Brits (mainly below 50) wouldn't object strongly to the legalisation of drugs and prostitution. Whilst I hate all drugs and am against prostitution, I'm still a realist.  I'm not saying I'm in favour of the legalisation of drugs but I think its better for societies (except for the gangs and dealers) that drugs are regulated and the women in prostitution are protected and have as safe environment as possible to work in.

However, I can't see the legalisation of drugs (I don't know much about prostitution) happening in the UK or many other European countries anytime soon, but we do respect the Dutch and the society they have. We don't look at them in disgust. Despite our more conservative society and laws, our teenage pregnancy, drug addiction and crime rates are significantly higher than the Netherlands and their more open, free, liberal society. Interpret that as you please.

In Britain, there is resentment towards some of the EU's more liberal social policies, a lot of people are angry at having laws and policies dictated to us by Brussels especially after the recent riots. There may well be a rise in Conservatism and an anti-EU feeling in Britain with regards to law and order as a response to the riots. By European standards Britain is no shining beacon of liberalism. In comparison to the US though, I guess we are.

To us in Europe, the idea of a devoutly religious government is frightening and most people seem to share the opinion that religion and politics are a dangerous, outdated mix in todays world.

Consequently our politicians and their policies are not (usually) guided by god, a phobia of all taxes and government and a mistrust of others.

Having said that, I've no doubt plenty of people would disagree with me here.

I've talked too much, time to actually do some work now!
Shameless self-promotion - http://plummerandchinsadventure.com/

Offline juskajo

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Re: Dirty, Dangerous & Dream Jobs [ Lesson ]
« Reply #19 on: September 15, 2011, 11:46:08 AM »
these are awesome. thanks.

here is a link to this thread for your convenience:
http://waygook.org/index.php/topic,21127.0.html