November 22, 2014, 10:02:03 AM


Author Topic: Books for Learning Korean (Self-Study)  (Read 77464 times)

Offline kickboxrko

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Well, although they do talk a bit, they also post pdf's and worksheets of the lessons, making things a lot more straightforward..

Offline toska

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Sun Hyunwoo is awesome. He was one of the guest speakers for our orientation back in August.

Yeah, he lectured again in Feburary this year.

And the site is awesome.

Offline Hiorns

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I have used this site since being in Korea and before I left my home country, and as a total 'newbie' I find it absolutely invaluable. I just started at the beginning and so I'm gradually working my way up through the myriad of lessons but it's incredibly useful in that you can just jump to a topic that is particularly relevant to you.
Although they may chat informally quite a lot, and I can see this being a little time-wasting  I suppose, they still provide an amazing set of resources and for free; where they could easily charge a moderate subscription fee. So no complaints from me :)

Absolute kudos to Sun Hyunwoo and his team!

Offline kcilks

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It can be really dry, but it is also really really comprehensive - if you wanna delve into the language, the U.S. Foreign Service has their courses online for free (with a ton more languages than just Korean, too). So that includes a pdf of the textbook and whatnot, which is pretty cool.

http://fsi-language-courses.org/Content.php?page=Korean

Offline wmroby

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Thanks kcilks. Definitely dry, but there's some good material on here.

Offline Orville

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+1 for Talk to me in Korean.

Like most you had already mentioned, it's great for the bus ride to work or something. I actually enjoy their banter though, keeps me awake.

Offline nonchalantninja

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THere are actually two different versions of "Lets Speak Korean"- an old 90's version,  which is quite cheesy, and the new version, with Lisa Kelly, a really hot gyopo girl.

The new version is far less cheesy, but I actually learn more from the older version because they don't chatter as much about off-topic stuff.

Both can be found on youtube.

Offline aaandy

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I have used several textbooks and online resources and find Talk To Me In Korean the best. It's true that there is a lot of banter going on but in all honesty I find it entertaining and, in my experience, it usually helps the phrases and language stick in my head a bit better - maybe because it is more informal and, after a whole days' worth of teaching the last thing I want is a hardcore lesson where I have to focus on every last word that's spoken. That's just my experience, anyway - I acknowledge that someone who wanted to study more intensely might find TTMIK a little too informal.

Let's Speak Korean is shown on Arirang TV and is also pretty good. I also second the above opinion - Lisa Kelley is pretty stunning:-) Now if that doesn't make you focus...!

Andrew

Offline village_idiot77

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Re: Online Korean-learning resources
« Reply #68 on: April 20, 2011, 05:11:44 PM »
www.koreanclass101.com - i've been using it for 3 years now and it is by far the best i've used. worth joining the site properly, but you can just download everything in your trial membership if you want.
http://korean.sogang.ac.kr - is pretty good too.
www.lang-8.com and www.livemocha.com are  interesting tools to practise with and to find chat contacts or language exchange partners (who actually want to do a language exchange).

if you want to use books, Sogang is my favourite series

Offline ccwilki1

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for learning korean!
« Reply #69 on: May 12, 2011, 11:33:11 AM »
I stumbled upon this website some time ago, but I have not really had the chance to share it. this is a really good website for those who are learning Korean at all levels.
It works on
- listening
- reading
- syntax
- writing and conversation style
- grammar structure
- and others...

very good website. http://korean.sogang.ac.kr/

Offline bebouchard

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Re: for learning korean!
« Reply #70 on: May 12, 2011, 11:55:35 AM »
There is also a site called Talk to Me in Korean www.ttmik.com, which is also very useful. You can study on the website directly, or download the lessons as podcasts.

Offline todd

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Korean language learning materials
« Reply #71 on: May 18, 2011, 02:44:52 PM »
I have been pretty regularly studying Korean on my own for the past 2 1/2 years, and I just wanted to throw in my two cents about the programs that I have used.  Basically, Iím giving all the information about the language programs that I wish somebody had given me when I started studying this language.  Also, there is a polyglot who became fluent in Korean who gave advice on a systematic approach to learning Korean right here:
http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=7606&PN=1
In fact, the above article is probably more important than anything in the rest of my post, so you should consider reading what he wrote first.

Hereís my assessment of my Korean ability:  I was conversationally fluent in Spanish after spending a year there (itís a little rusty now) and I can honestly say my Korean is not at that level yet.  However, I can hold a decent conversation and itís good enough for my students to think that Iím fluent.  I took an old TOPIK Beginner test and aced it.  The Intermediate one gave me quite a bit of trouble, though.  Anyway, listed below are the programs that I used and what I thought of them.  Iíve divided my opinions into two sections: Recommended and Not Recommended


Recommended:

Survival Korean by Steven Revere:  I wish I had started out with this book.  The dialogues are great and really useful.  The drills are not comprehensive enough to internalize the material, but the dialogues more than made up for that.  I also worked through his Basic Grammar Skills book.  Neither of his books will make you fluent, but you will understand Korean grammar more and you will get a good basic vocabulary.

Speaking Korean by Francis Y. T. Park:  This book was the Korean gold mine for me.  I worked through Book 1 (there are 4 books in the series) in about 3 or 4 months and saw my speaking and comprehension skyrocket.  It is a really dry bookó400+ pages and everything is a drill, explanation, or review.  That being said, every chapter presented something relevant to my life. The day after studying a chapter, I would invariably hear some of the vocabulary words or verb conjugations from that chapter used around me.

Letís Speak Korean (old series / first series) on Youtube:  These are 15-minute videos that focus on a small aspect of the language.  In the first year of my studies, I felt like I learned more from this than I did from Rosetta Stone, Integrated Korean, and Pimsleur Korean combined.  Here is a link to the first one: http://www.youtube.com/user/ruthnp75#p/u/302/A93eF6Jwpow  The same user uploaded 60 episodes of that season.  I was not a fan of the later seriesí of Letís Speak Korean, as they seemed more focused on entertaining rather than educating the viewer.

Click Korean: http://lei.snu.ac.kr/site/en/klec/click-korean/index.jsp
This is Seoul National Universityís Korean Language website.  I found it fun and interesting, and it really helped build up my vocabulary.  It was difficult the first time through, but later it became an enjoyable and easy review after I had gone through both Survival Korean (Revere) and Speaking Korean (Park).  I would recommend this one.

Sogang Universityís Korean Program: http://korean.sogang.ac.kr/
Songangís program is another internet based Korean learning program.  I made it through all of the Novice 1 lessons and I really liked them.  All the material was relevant to daily conversation, but the recorded conversations are spoken really fastówhich, on the plus side, makes it rewarding when you finally understand them.  I started Lesson 1 of the Novice 2 level and immediately quit because of the reading, which was completely boring and seemed irrelevant to conversation. 


Not Recommended:

Rosetta Stone: I learned colors, shapes, and to say things like, ďThe boy is jumping.Ē  This is after spending roughly 60 hours on it.  Not worth the money in my opinion.  Also, the lessons tend to run around an hour, and itís hard for me to focus on them past the 30-45 minute mark. 

Pimsleur Complete Korean: I did parts one and two--all 60 lessons.  I bought it because I had used Pimsleursí programs for Portuguese and French and they seemed pretty solid.  However, I wasnít impressed with the Korean program at all. I learned the material pretty thoroughly, yet I still felt that I couldnít really speak anything.

Integrated Korean: I bought this one after reading the reviews on Amazon.  At the time it had the highest rating of all the Korean textbooks on the site.  I hated this one so much that I went out of my way to write a negative review of it and give it one star out of five.  Itís probably the longest one star rating for that book.  The high ratings on Amazon really made me wonder how much those users had progressed through the book before they decided to rate it.

FSI Korean: This was the first Korean book that I studied from.  Itís public domain so you can find a free download of it if you search on Google. It was extremely difficult for me.  I started and stopped it various times, and only made it through Unit 7 or 8. Pros: It really drilled the information. I felt I really LEARNED the material it covered because of how thorough the drills were.  Cons: It is very dry and difficult, the speakers are not native (Koreans will laugh at the pronunciation), some of the vocabulary is outdated, and there is no Hangeul. 

Elementary Korean: I liked this book, but the 2nd edition still had a lot of typos that could confuse and frustrate a student.  I stopped using this textbook in protest of all the typos.  I also stopped it because I found Speaking Korean by Francis Y. T. Park, which was recommended in the link at the top of this post.


Korean is not a simple language to learn by any means, but you can definitely make progress if you learn on a consistent basis and have good materials to study from.  I have one final piece of advice:  If you are using a program, book, CD, Korean teacher, or any other learning method that you are not making progress with, then consider changing that aspect of your learning.  Donít make things more difficult on yourself by trying to stick with what isnít working.  Change methods and keep searching until you find what works for you. Good luck!

Offline happyBuddha

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Re: Korean language learning materials
« Reply #72 on: May 18, 2011, 02:52:36 PM »
Thank you for such a thorough post todd. I began studying Korean on my own as a hobby a few years back and now that I actually live in Korea and have begun adjusting to the rhythm around me I'm ready to pick up again with formal self-study of the language. I would take a class but my current schedule doesn't permit that kind of structured time commitment. Your suggestions came at a great time for me!!

Offline Koenji

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Re: Korean language learning materials
« Reply #73 on: May 18, 2011, 03:05:08 PM »

Not Recommended:

Rosetta Stone: I learned colors, shapes, and to say things like, ďThe boy is jumping.Ē  This is after spending roughly 60 hours on it.  Not worth the money in my opinion.  Also, the lessons tend to run around an hour, and itís hard for me to focus on them past the 30-45 minute mark. 


100% agree with that. Total waste of money for those considering.

Offline foreverJ

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Re: Korean language learning materials
« Reply #74 on: May 18, 2011, 03:55:37 PM »
I reccommend Rob's course: http://www.learnkoreanonline.net/freevids/
there are about 4 hours of video available for free

Offline Loki001

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Re: Korean language learning materials
« Reply #75 on: May 18, 2011, 04:18:00 PM »
What an excellent post. I also share your distain for Rosetta Stone, Integrated Korean and Pimsler.

I have found the spaced repetition program Anki most useful. I love that I can enter the vocabulary that I want to study. It's also so convenient, my home computer, work computer and my Iphone all sync the same deck with each other, so no matter where I am I can spend a few minutes studying whenever I have time. I have attached the deck I made which you need the program to use (there are of course a few errors, but I checked my native sources for most of the facts). You can download it from the like below and the best part is it's free.
http://ankisrs.net/

Offline mikkilrod83

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Re: What are some recommended Korean language self-studying materials?
« Reply #76 on: June 08, 2011, 06:39:42 PM »
You should try Active Korean which is published by Seoul National Univ.  It's got English and Korean in it and is pretty self-explanatory.  It's used at SNU in their Korean Language Insitute.

If you're more advanced, try Sogang Uni's textbooks.  However, those are completely in Korean even the directions, so good luck with that.

Offline valium kilmer

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Re: Books for Learning Korean (Self-Study)
« Reply #77 on: June 09, 2011, 02:05:11 PM »
I have some kind of cultural allowance at school, and as is the way, communication is pretty non-existent and when it is, doesn't seem to follow any logic similar to my own (not that my own is faultless, mind...)

However, it appears I have 100,000won to spend on Korean study text books before the end of the month (or basically Korean learning).  I had the same last semester - but that 100,000 went a long way and basically I have no other costs.  However, I will be going home in August, hopefully for only 1 year, and so wanted to carry on studying Korean - and since Korean language books aren't particularly easy to pick up back home, I thought I could arm myself with a few to take back.

I would say i'm probably low-intermediate - reading/listening comprehension is much better than speaking, and I'm currently working my way through the 가나다 Intermediate 2 book, having completed the 2 previous books.

Does anyone have any recommendations for a series of books for self study that I could pick up and run with back home.  I bought Sogang 3B roughly 7 months ago but put it to one side as I thought it was a little beyond my grasp, though now I think it would be ok. 

So at present I'm thinking of just stocking up with a few of the Sogang books and working my way through them - unless anyone has any recommendations....

땡규 in advance

Offline Eros

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Re: Books for Learning Korean (Self-Study)
« Reply #78 on: June 09, 2011, 02:49:34 PM »
Just go to a bookstore. There's a whole section of Korean language learning books and they're relatively inexpensive. Plus you can open the book and read through it and see if you like it or not. One of the great things about Korea is you can read a book in the store and then not buy it and nobody cares.

Offline tisliz

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Re: Books for Learning Korean (Self-Study)
« Reply #79 on: June 09, 2011, 03:01:44 PM »
"How to Learn Korean: Learn Korean With Pictures" It's a yellow book. The latter half of this book's title is in Korean, but it can be purchased for cheap from the Kyobo bookstore. It's especially good for visual learners, and introducing the major aspects of Korean grammar at the end of each section. Check it out!

 

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