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Author Topic: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?  (Read 24308 times)

Offline adamwatch

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #20 on: June 13, 2011, 03:55:30 PM »
Been to all three. Korea and Japan  have been occupied by the Americans since 1945 and to a large extent they have lost their culture and know this. China has kept its culture and has retained the tea shops and  Chinese traditions   and not swapped them for the coffee and doughnuts culture of the other  two. Also Chinese people know their country is going up in the world whereas Japan and Korea know it is going down. So if you want the real Asian experience go to China if you want a very much Westernised Asian experience try the other two.

Adam

Offline jcm91186

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2011, 04:31:16 PM »
I've studied in Japan and have been all around Honshu. Tokyo vs Seoul...Tokyo is cleaner, transportation more expensive, eating out is more expensive and the people seem to be nice but tired of foreigners. Seoul is more fun for drinking and partying, cheaper all around and I personally like the food better here in Korea. However, Seoul has a lot of trash on the streets and I can't seem to ever escape the smell of sewage. I think Japanese fashion is more interesting. In Korea, I notice the diversity in fashion is not vast like it is in Japan. I mean, Harajuku girls...I love it when they stroll down the street in Tokyo...so entertaining.

Outside of Tokyo/Seoul, Japan is welcoming to foreigners ESPECIALLY if you try to speak their language...very polite and will give you a nod or a smile on the street. Japanese girls are more happy-go-lucky and willing to interact with foreigner (males). Outside of Tokyo, transportation isn't as bad but much more than Korea.

I live in Busan and people still give me looks and the whole ajumma-bully thing is pretty interesting.  Girls are less likely to trust a foreigner here BUT I've met enough laid-back Korean girls to know that that isn't how all the girls act. Transportation is soooooo cheap here I love it, going out at night is cheap, food is fairly priced at the markets.

As far as xenophobia goes, I've come to learn something about both cultures. On the surface, Japanese appear to be so kind and polite, but I've had the chance to become close friends with a few Japanese...and I've discovered that for the most part, they do put up a facade (裏 ura). Not all Japanese dislike foreigners, in fact I still believe they are more open, but for anything, they may say they love/like something but really they are just trying to fit in and be accepting so they will appear kind.  Doesn't sound like much, but when working/living with them this kinda thing does get a little annoying.  In the culture I'm from we don't beat around the bush, so this was something I had to learn to deal with when interacting with the Japanese. Koreans on the other hand don't hide their feelings about something, so for that I can respect them, although the brutal truth can be a little hard to hear Monday morning after a long weekend  :D

Offline Freeto

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2011, 04:44:16 PM »
I've lived in Japan several years and now Korea and visited China 3-4x.  Here are two points that are way off.

Quote
Korea and Japan  have been occupied by the Americans since 1945 and to a large extent they have lost their culture and know this. China has kept its culture and has retained the tea shops and  Chinese traditions   and not swapped them for the coffee and doughnuts culture of the other  two.

Even in McDonald's in Tokyo this would be untrue. Just observe the cleanliness and high level of service you'd get and compare it to a McDonald's in N. America, heck even Korea. The farther you move away from the cities the more this statement proves false.

Think hard about Japan's cultural exports both past (geisha, kimono, zen, bonsai, sushi, karate, etc.) and current (manga, anime, otaku, Harajuku, Hayao Miyazaki, cosplay, etc.) and ask: does this strike you as a country that has "lost" culture?

Quote
Korea (or at least city Korea) is a lot cleaner than Japan or China.
In the several years I lived in Japan I RARELY saw people litter or spit because when it happened it seemed really jarring at the time.

In Korea it's a good morning when there isn't a warm glob of spit IN THE ELEVATOR. And then I hit the streets and the spit and litter-fest begins  ::)

Quote
I think Japan is totally different than China or Korea.  While the Japanese language is similar to Korean, and has similar characters to Chinese I find that Japan is a world unto itself.  It has so many different types of youth culture which obviously sets it apart from the uniform youth culture of Korea.  All while maintain a strong respect for history and the past.

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Offline greyskymornings

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2011, 04:48:16 PM »
Never having been to China, I can't really speak about that. But after having lived here in Korea for a year, when I went to Japan on my break it felt like taking a three-hour ferry to a different planet.

Japanese jaw-droppers:

- Drivers actually stop for red lights! And pedestrians! How novel! I don't have enough digits to count how many times I've nearly been killed on Korean streets.

- I didn't have to dodge any kimchi puke puddles or disgusting phlegm-hacking ajushis. (As I type this very sentence, the teacher next to me is hacking phlegm onto a paper on his desk.)

- The streets in the cities I visited in southern Japan were absolutely immaculate. Honestly, it looked like someone had scrubbed them. There weren't even cigarette butts on the ground. Compared to Korea, it was like the Twilight Zone.

- People were exceptionally friendly and helpful. I went in to break a large bill at a Japanese restaurant and when the girl at the front desk discovered I was going to take a taxi (instead of the much cheaper bus option) she left work and walked me two blocks down to the bus stop, wrote down directions and got me a ticket exactly where I needed to go. True story. I was amazed.

- You can get food that is both non-spicy AND non-fermented in Japan.

- Public transportation (city buses and highway buses) was much more comfortable. The Seoul subway may be clean-ish, but people hacking and sneezing all over the handles gave one of my friends TB.

My one and only downside:

- Japan is more expensive.

Offline Hoosier_Jedi

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2011, 05:28:19 PM »
Korea was a part of Ancient China.  I'm just assuming about japan, but I believe they were too at one point.  Koreans and the Japanese later developed their own languages, and become tributary countries to China. 

You assume wrong, slick. On both fronts.

Offline leo fuchigami

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2011, 06:37:23 PM »
Some background before I answer to add some legitimacy to my post.

I'm Japanese-Canadian. I have an intermediate grasp of both Korean and Mandarin Chinese and speak Japanese pretty fluently. I studied for one summer in a Chinese university and traveled to most of the major cities and volunteered and lived in villages in the South and West. I've been living in Korea for 8.5 months and volunteered in the poorer areas of Seoul as well. I have also been to Japan about 8 times now, once to study as a child, but mostly as a tourist living in my relatives' houses.

All three countries are xenophobic. It's really hard to generalize but if I had to...
Caucasians or people from major economies (that are either Western or Japan) are received better.
Chinese are definitely more comfortable with diversity. Their entire history revolves around the unification of tribes and minorities. You'd be surprised what Chinese people can look like if you go to villages or further away from the East coast. It may sound confusing but I'd have to say that Japanese people have a better tolerance of foreigners, but Chinese are inherently more accepting. I think Korea and Japan have a greater interest in the Western powers and English, but Japan has a more eclectic perspective. Koreans tend to identify themselves by comparing themselves to Japan, the US and to a lesser extent, the rest of Asia. Japan focuses a lot more on USA, China and Germany. Chinese people tend to compare themselves to other Chinese people (other cities or provinces). China really is like a conglomeration of many nations so it's totally different from Korea and Japan in that regard.

I think a lot of the differences can be explained by the economic position of each nation. Japan is an established world power so it doesn't have the intense drive that Korea and China do to improve their economic positions. Chinese and Koreans HAVE to learn English and HAVE to compete with the rest of the world to make their mark. Japan is very complacent in many ways because of their success (the same thing can be said for all the established Western powers vs. their tier 2 neighbors).
Korea has been in the shadow of Japan for the last few centuries, but has used Japan as a model to build their nation. Japan used the US in the same way since the 50's. As a result, Korea is very similar to Japan from 20 years ago.
China is a different story. They basically dominated the world pre-British imperialism. They didn't receive the benefits of being colonized or controlled by Western powers (I'm going to get a lot of flack here, but my opinion is that Japan became the world power it is because of the American influence after WW2. Korea benefitted heavily (in terms of educational and political reform, infrastructure gains and business) from Japanese colonization. Similarly, Singapore and Hong Kong benefitted heavily from British colonization.)

If you look at all three countries, they have a history of opening up to the world, then closing themselves off. Japan opened themselves up in the 70's to 90's and are starting to show signs of closing themselves off again. Korea is currently trying to open themselves up, but I can see them following in Japan's footsteps in a few decades.
China is growing in a very different way. Their ascension is very unique. I can't really predict what will happen next. Liberal reform, fractionization, collapse? It's a tough call.

So...I'm totally not answering the OP's question at this point, but I don't want to delete what I've written so I"m going to post it anyways.

Favorite things from each country?
China - the intense drive to live a better life
Korea - the intense nationalism and pride
Japan - the intense contrast (conservative fashion and downright absurd fashion; world leading high rise architecture and thousand year old temples; etc.)
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Offline adamwatch

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2011, 07:57:23 PM »
China is the big Empire aof the the past, Korea and Japan are reflections of this earlier great Empire. Over 60 per cent of Korean words come from China. Korea takes pride in Confucianism again it came from China. Korea and Japan now play baseball before 1945 they didn't.  Different times different cultural influences.

Adam

Offline kdawg860

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2011, 11:03:32 PM »
Korea has been in the shadow of Japan for the last few centuries, but has used Japan as a model to build their nation. Japan used the US in the same way since the 50's. As a result, Korea is very similar to Japan from 20 years ago.
China is a different story. They basically dominated the world pre-British imperialism. They didn't receive the benefits of being colonized or controlled by Western powers (I'm going to get a lot of flack here, but my opinion is that Japan became the world power it is because of the American influence after WW2. Korea benefitted heavily (in terms of educational and political reform, infrastructure gains and business) from Japanese colonization. Similarly, Singapore and Hong Kong benefitted heavily from British colonization.)

i think you may be partially correct here.  it's tough to think that being colonized may have benefits.  but once you realize that sometimes a country's own govt can be more oppressive than the colonizer, then it makes sense.  mao's govt was far more oppressive than the british.  thus hong kong thrived while the rest of china starved.  you can see the difference b/w north and south korea also, north being far more oppressed by kim il sung and kim jung il, and south having the u.s. and its own govt relatively lightly oppress it.

japan in comparison has been much more liberal in the sense that its govt was much freer/less controlling/doesnt oppress as much, there was never such a huge fear of communism (that i know of).  its public transportation is much more controlled by private corporations.  heck even its post offices were partially privatized (or attempted to).  korean and chinese govts largely control their societies.

eh, i hope we dont too much into politics.  but i think govt oppression is largely to blame for uniformity/lack of diversity/outward xenophobia (due to brainwashing by the govt).

if this sparks a huge politics debate then i really regret posting this. lol.

Offline Sara

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #28 on: June 13, 2011, 11:28:08 PM »
Please stay on topic and only discuss what it's like to live and work in these countries.

Offline kdawg860

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2011, 02:46:26 AM »
i asked a coteacher and he said that korea's the only country where the kids go to school all day and all night long.

maybe your kids in other countries will have happier lives.

Offline keleidoscope

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #30 on: June 28, 2011, 04:52:28 PM »
I taught in Japan for two years, several years before I came to Korea.

When people want the short version of how living there was different, I say ‘Korea is more modern, but less convenient’.

For the long version:

Working
In Korea it is more casual, a lot of jobs in Japan want you to wear a suit, and pretend you are some kind of professional.  Seeing your students outside of class was discouraged where I worked, but I had friends who wore whatever and hung out with students, so every school is different.

Getting around
In Japan everyone has a bike, and it is safe and easy to ride anywhere, and there is always bike parking.  People who do drive have compact cars, I was surprised at all the sedans in Korea.  You still have to watch out for crazy drivers though.

Being a freakshow
I got annoying people I didn’t know saying hello and how are you on the street in both places equally.

Living
The cost of living in Japan was slightly higher, but so was my salary.  I went out several nights a week and rarely cooked at home and never had any money problems.

Drinking
I found people willing to drink till they dropped on any night of the week in both countries.

Travel
Domestic travel in Japan is expensive, and so is the bullet train, when compared with the KTX.  You can get a cheap business hotel easily though, or stay in a capsule which costs more than crashing in a jimjilbang, but it a lot nicer.

Norebang (karaoke)
In Japan is FAR superior, you pay less than in Korea and get all you can drink included.

Shopping
In Japan you have to use cash, you can’t pay with a card at the checkout.  Your bank may also close it’s ATMs at 5pm.  There are more convenience stores and vending machines and you can buy a lot more in the middle of the night than you can in Korea.  There were also a lot more interesting shops in Japan, instead of having to go to Homeplus for everything.

People
In Japan is someone bumps into you on the street, they will say sorry.  Also if they want to pass you, they will say excuse me.  I think Japan is more normal here and Korea is the odd country out.  Less people hacking their lugies out at the bus stop.

That’s all I can think of.  I actually plan on writing a bit of an article on the differences in working in both places, because a lot of friends have asked me.  Maybe I’ll finish it one day and link it.

Quote
do you know if there's a way to teach English in Japan that doesn't involve the JET program?

That’s like asking is Epik is the only way to teach in Korea… Seriously though, there are HEAPS of conversation schools.  There are a lot more chains over there (the ones that have survived) but also lots of privately owned places.  Gaijinpot and esl café are places you can browse job listings.

Quote
Drivers actually stop for red lights! And pedestrians! How novel! I don't have enough digits to count how many times I've nearly been killed on Korean streets.
Not where I lived!  They do not just stop their cars in the far lane though, they use parking spaces.

All in all, Korea is fun and I am saving more money, but I liked living in Japan better.  It was just ‘nicer’.

Offline actualstarfish

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #31 on: July 08, 2011, 03:08:04 PM »
Some background before I answer to add some legitimacy to my post.

I'm Japanese-Canadian. I have an intermediate grasp of both Korean and Mandarin Chinese and speak Japanese pretty fluently. I studied for one summer in a Chinese university and traveled to most of the major cities and volunteered and lived in villages in the South and West. I've been living in Korea for 8.5 months and volunteered in the poorer areas of Seoul as well. I have also been to Japan about 8 times now, once to study as a child, but mostly as a tourist living in my relatives' houses.

All three countries are xenophobic. It's really hard to generalize but if I had to...
Caucasians or people from major economies (that are either Western or Japan) are received better.
Chinese are definitely more comfortable with diversity. Their entire history revolves around the unification of tribes and minorities. You'd be surprised what Chinese people can look like if you go to villages or further away from the East coast. It may sound confusing but I'd have to say that Japanese people have a better tolerance of foreigners, but Chinese are inherently more accepting. I think Korea and Japan have a greater interest in the Western powers and English, but Japan has a more eclectic perspective. Koreans tend to identify themselves by comparing themselves to Japan, the US and to a lesser extent, the rest of Asia. Japan focuses a lot more on USA, China and Germany. Chinese people tend to compare themselves to other Chinese people (other cities or provinces). China really is like a conglomeration of many nations so it's totally different from Korea and Japan in that regard.

I think a lot of the differences can be explained by the economic position of each nation. Japan is an established world power so it doesn't have the intense drive that Korea and China do to improve their economic positions. Chinese and Koreans HAVE to learn English and HAVE to compete with the rest of the world to make their mark. Japan is very complacent in many ways because of their success (the same thing can be said for all the established Western powers vs. their tier 2 neighbors).
Korea has been in the shadow of Japan for the last few centuries, but has used Japan as a model to build their nation. Japan used the US in the same way since the 50's. As a result, Korea is very similar to Japan from 20 years ago.
China is a different story. They basically dominated the world pre-British imperialism. They didn't receive the benefits of being colonized or controlled by Western powers (I'm going to get a lot of flack here, but my opinion is that Japan became the world power it is because of the American influence after WW2. Korea benefitted heavily (in terms of educational and political reform, infrastructure gains and business) from Japanese colonization. Similarly, Singapore and Hong Kong benefitted heavily from British colonization.)

If you look at all three countries, they have a history of opening up to the world, then closing themselves off. Japan opened themselves up in the 70's to 90's and are starting to show signs of closing themselves off again. Korea is currently trying to open themselves up, but I can see them following in Japan's footsteps in a few decades.
China is growing in a very different way. Their ascension is very unique. I can't really predict what will happen next. Liberal reform, fractionization, collapse? It's a tough call.

So...I'm totally not answering the OP's question at this point, but I don't want to delete what I've written so I"m going to post it anyways.

Favorite things from each country?
China - the intense drive to live a better life
Korea - the intense nationalism and pride
Japan - the intense contrast (conservative fashion and downright absurd fashion; world leading high rise architecture and thousand year old temples; etc.)

Thanks for your input Leo, your posts are always interesting. Keep 'em coming people! I'm planning on teaching in Japan once I buffer up my qualifications enough in Korea so I'm definitely interesting in hearing different people's experiences with the other countries. I've traveled to Japan twice since I've been in Korea but I don't feel like it was enough time to form a legitimate opinion about Japan vs. Korea.

Offline ESLinsider

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2011, 02:51:07 AM »
I have been to all three and lived in China, Korea and Taiwan. I wrote this starters guide on teaching English in Asia. Maybe this will give you some ideas on the differences.
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Offline jimmyjamison

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #33 on: October 13, 2011, 11:01:49 AM »
ask your co-teachers! Mine told me: "Japanese have bad teeth. Chinese smell bad. That is how you can tell the difference between a Japanese person, a Chinese person, and a Korean person."

Offline actualstarfish

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #34 on: October 27, 2011, 12:57:07 PM »
I have been to all three and lived in China, Korea and Taiwan. I wrote this starters guide on teaching English in Asia. Maybe this will give you some ideas on the differences.

lipofootoo, your thoughts about Korea pretty much mirror mine exactly. I know you mentioned in your guide that you haven't actually lived in Japan, but is the stuff you wrote about it based on your vacations to Japan or from talking with people who've lived and worked there? I've been to Japan twice since I've been in Korea and both times it seemed like an immensely better place for me to be. However, I was only there for short vacations and I know living in a country can be very different from just travelling there.

I'd be interested to hear what the Japanese people are like, how nationalistic they are, and how they treat foreigners compared to Korea. I'm not gonna lie, the intense nationalism and the widespread belief in ethnic superiority in Korea was amusing to me at first but now its getting irritating.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2011, 04:45:30 PM by actualstarfish »

Offline alexc2000

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #35 on: October 14, 2012, 01:58:49 AM »
I have been to Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea. I was too young to remember anything about Japan.

I know that Taiwan's streets are more crowded than that of South Korea when it comes to scooters and street food vendors.

Offline shaolinPWNstyle

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #36 on: October 16, 2012, 08:27:41 AM »
I have only been to Japan for a week vacation and I lived in Korea for a year. I was very interested, and still am, in teaching in Japan, so I've read lots about it. Most has been covered in this post already, but some other things would be...

Money in Japan is kind of annoying. The lowest bill in Japan is 1000 yen, which is ~$10. Everything lower than that is coinage. So, you'll end up with tons of coins! Plus, paying with cards isn't as common as Korea, so I was stuck with tons of coins. This is how they make you use all those vending machines >:(.

Tattoos are a bigger deal in Japan. I don't know for sure about this since I don't have any tattoos, but I've read that onsens (jimjilbangs aka bath houses) and gyms in Japan won't allow people with tattoos to enter or join.

Japanese people are smaller. I felt taller in Japan than I felt in Korea. Plus, Korean men are generally stronger (from the military service?).

Japanese girls are very cute (maybe to a fault sometimes). Already smaller, they just seem to be cuter with their mannerisms. You'll notice that their voices are really high pitched sometimes too.

*Nerd time*! Korean gaming vs Japanese gaming. Koreans like to play a lot of free-to-play PC games at their beloved PC Bangs (Sudden Attack, Crazy Arcade, etc.). If not those games, then it seems to be limited to Tekken, Starcraft, World of Warcraft, and some music games.

Japan sticks to Nintendo and Sony and arcades. Gundam games are really huge in Japanese arcades now. Some franchises are extremely successful in Japan too (Mario, Pokémon, Dragon Quest, Final Fantasy, Monster Hunter, etc.).

Both countries love gaming, so it's much more respected than in USA. The arcade scene is still strong in Japan and Korea. If you want to play at an arcade in Korea or Japan and you're new, try to play with a friend or against the computer. I'm pretty good at Tekken, but I get beat down with authority every now and then in Korea and Japan. *Nerd time over*

Another fun fact is that Japan has a ton of Brazilians! The largest colony of Japanese people outside of Japan is in Brazil. That's why, here in Brazil, people usually call Asians (before meeting him or her) 'Japanese', similar to how people in USA think Asians there are from China. Some Japanese-Brazilians go to Japan to work and vice versa.

Offline alyssa.callahan

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #37 on: October 16, 2012, 11:01:07 AM »
i asked a coteacher and he said that korea's the only country where the kids go to school all day and all night long.

maybe your kids in other countries will have happier lives.

Nah, Japan is the same way.  It gets later as they get older.  All that cram school, you know?  ;)  But if your co-teacher was looking at places like the States when he said that, he'd be absolutely correct.  If I had to go to school and then cram school and then do homework, I'd probably crack after day 1.  Mad props to my students!

As far as this topic goes, it was really interesting to read everyone's opinions!  I studied in Japan during the summer of 2010 and of course am currently living in Korea.  I've never been to China, although one of my best friends is from China and I'd love to visit her some time!  This may have just been my own personal experience, but to me, the air in Japan seemed a bit calmer, or less stressed.  I know that's not actually the case, as Japanese people work just as hard and sometimes harder than anyone else in the world, but that was the impression I got as a college student in Japan.  Since I'm working in Korea, it may just be that my experiences are on different scales, but that's just the feeling I got when I was there.

Although I do know more of the Japanese language than the Korean language and was able to get around easier.  That may have played a part.

But yes, Japan is more expensive!

Offline alexc2000

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #38 on: November 11, 2012, 11:22:54 PM »
I notice the dragon doesn't really appear in Korea except for the Chinese restaurants which also serve Korean food.

As for the food, I notice Chinese food uses more soy sauce while Korean food uses more spicy paste. The only similarities that I can think of are rice, dumplings, steamed buns, and jjajangmyeon.

Korea's doenjang reminds me of Japan's miso. Kimbab reminds me of sushi. Udon is served in a lot of Korean restaurants too.

I think Koreans are obsessed with saving time while Chinese are obsessed with saving money.
It reminds me of that time with me and my Korean co-teacher. I wanted to take the cheaper bus back home. It took more time though. At the same time, she wanted to take the faster but more expensive way back home.

I am an ethnic Chinese (Taiwanese American) if you haven't figured it out.

As for language, Korean is more similar to Japanese than to Chinese. Though Korean does have some similar words as that of Chinese. Some people also make the argument that Korean and Japanese belong in the same language family as Mongolian while Chinese is in a different language family.

Korean, Japanese, and Chinese all have their own scripts.

Japanese confuse 'r' and 'l' sounds while Koreans confuse 'f' and 'p' sounds. I haven't had formal education in Chinese so I don't really know what letter sounds confuse Chinese speakers.

As for language difficulties:
- Chinese has the most complicated writing system - over 30,000 symbols.
- Chinese has 5 tones which makes it even more confusing.
- Spelling is easier in Japanese. When I speak Japanese, it sounds like I am spelling out the words (わたし -> わ - た - し). It only gets confusing when the vowel is stretched out like じい vs. じ.
- Spelling is more difficult in Korean. It is easy to confuse '어' with '오,' '애' with '에,' '얘' with '예,' and 'ᄉ' with 'ᄊ.'
- Japanese have a separate script for foreign words (katakana) while Chinese and Korean just use one script for both native words and foreign words.

Offline 0mnslnd

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Re: Difference between Korea, China, and Japan?
« Reply #39 on: November 11, 2012, 11:55:35 PM »
Interesting. How about their different views and attitudes towards foreigners though.  I think most of us
agree that Koreans are still in their baby shoes when it comes to dealing with foreigners, while China and Japan have done so for centuries.

In all seriousness, among the 3, Korea is the worst place to be a foreigner.
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