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Author Topic: High School - X - Future Lessons  (Read 17555 times)

jellomando

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High School - X - Future Lessons
« on: April 28, 2008, 11:43:59 PM »
    My contract is over so this will be the last installment in my high school lesson list.   Basically it's a list of ideas that never quite made it into full lessons:

Dancing
An easy vocabulary based lesson using videos from YouTube.  Depending on how broad you want to go there's [noembed] , , or (Featuring K-Kid Hong 10).  If you want to extend it there's always Cha Cha, Disco, Flamenco, Foxtrot, Jazz, Line Dancing, Mambo, Merengue, Peabody, Polka, Rumba, Salsa, Samba, Swing, Tango, Twist, Waltz, etc.  In theory this lesson should work since the kids are all about 'freestyle' and cross-dressing pantomime.[/noembed][/li][/list]

My Home Country
I can't believe I never got around to this but this is an easy lesson to do if you use my Geography templates.  Another take is to turn it into a Korea vs. My Home Country.  For example, compare Canada and Korea by landmass, population, etc with visual maps.  Demonstrate how many South Koreas can fit into Canada or compare population of Seoul by drawing a circle by filling it with the population of Canadian cities.  You can even get into the concept of monocultural and multicultural societies if the class is advance enough.

Loanwords
This is from this Korea Beat article but it could be treated as an extension of the Konglish lesson.

Hyperbole
In a Korean context this would seem like an attack on the English press in Korea, but really it's an attack on bad writing everywhere.  No nation is immune from it.  As an introduction you would start out my comparatives and superlatives lesson but introduce the concepts of exaggerations.  Big, Bigger, and Biggest leads into Huge, Gigantic, Mammoth, etc.  And then if your class is smart enough, break out the Namdaemun hyperboles and explain why the writing is good for entertainment but bad for journalism.

Stereotypes
This is another advance class, largely built from what I learned in about racism and xenophobic racism post and can be split into many smaller areas.  This could be a sensitive subject so the best way is to introduce the stereotype in question and the follow up with the equivalent Korean stereotype.  For example Brian and Matt have done amazing work covering the recent example of Nazism Chic.

Anyhoo that's all I got.  On a more entertaining note I had one oddly placed day in my schedule so I came up with this extension to my sports lesson:

« Last Edit: May 01, 2008, 11:36:29 AM by jellomando »

Offline luke

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High School - Mixed Lessons
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2010, 10:25:05 AM »
Here are my four most recent lessons.

Hope someone finds them useful!

Offline zachmokpo

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Re: High School - Mixed Lessons
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2010, 10:23:05 AM »
Luke,

Is there any way you could save these as just normal .ppt format?

Offline sleeman

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Re: High School - Mixed Lessons
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2010, 12:44:55 PM »
Zach you should download OpenOffice, Its free, it opens pptX, and best of all its English! I use it all the time

http://www.openoffice.org/

Offline zachmokpo

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Re: High School - Mixed Lessons
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2010, 08:35:11 AM »
Slee,

OO is firewalled at my new school. :( I'd download it at home but I have no net yet. Soon.

roymelling

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High School: Lots of lessons and topics
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2011, 03:34:02 PM »
Hey,

I've just been informed by the education office that I will be transfered to a High School next year.

Since then, I've been looking for material that may be of use for that level..so, what do you guys think of these links? 

http://www.sendaiedu.com/searchbytext.html

I aslo found this:

http://jhsenglipediaproject.com/jep.aspx

« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 04:26:00 PM by roymelling »

Offline CherryBlossom

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Re: High School: Lots of lessons and topics
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2011, 09:12:49 AM »
This is great!!! Thanks for posting! There is def a lot to use depending on the level of your students!

Good luck!
Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful.

Offline 7Suarez7

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Girls high school - Grade 1
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2011, 01:00:41 PM »
I'm about to start teaching a weekend class to grade 1 high school girls and I'm unsure about where to pitch the lesson.

I'd appreciate any advice from teachers already teaching to grade 1 high school girls - what sort of things can i expect? I know everyone's different but just some general advice/tips would be a great help!

Offline kapteyn

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Re: Girls high school - Grade 1
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2011, 01:21:00 PM »
I actually just started teaching at a girls high school also. I do grades 1 and 2. What I have found is that although there is a pretty big spread as far as level goes they have liked the lessons that have been a bit more challenging most. Whenever I tried to tone it down for them they would glaze over on me. It seems like most of the time the higher level students will help out the lower level ones also. Also, use waygook.org. This site has already saved my butt several times with some awesome lessons.
Attached is a great opposites lesson that my friend Matt gave me. He is also teaching a girls high school out here.
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Offline 7Suarez7

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Re: Girls high school - Grade 1
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2011, 02:12:48 PM »
Thanks Kapetyn, much appreciated! Do you do anything in terms of rewards/merit system? At elementary school I would offer a pizza party or ice cream at end of the semester to students who had done well but korean teenage girls seem a lot more careful with what they eat than rowdy elementary kids!

Also how do you find the girls when it comes to speaking? My assumption would be that their quite shy, how have you found it?


Offline kapteyn

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Re: Girls high school - Grade 1
« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2011, 02:32:13 PM »
I cant do rewards in my school because they cycle through month to month with different groups of kids missing every week. That sort of ruins anything cumulative I would like to do.

They are EXTREMELY shy at first. I am a guy so they obviously have taken a little while getting used to a waygook around the building. It is getting better but I find that the longer I am here and the more public speaking/volunteering/presenting I have them do in the class the better they feel about it and the more likely they are to volunteer. Stickers and candy help too.

As far as some of the more advanced ones they have really been talking to me quite a bit actually. Some have excellent English but most just know the simple exchanges. Like I said though, if you can get them to come a little bit out of their shells they might really surprise you with how much they know.
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Offline mrobinett

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Re: Girls high school - Grade 1
« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2011, 02:44:40 PM »
Thanks for the shout-out Bruce!

I teach G1 High School girls as well Turner. There is no book to go by so I just make up a new lesson each time. Since you are teaching a weekend class I'm assuming you are in the same boat. I propose that we post any lessons that work well on this thread. Bruce already posted an opposites lesson that went over really well in my class.

Offline Yu_Bumsuk

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Re: Girls high school - Grade 1
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2011, 02:49:44 PM »
I'm about to start teaching a weekend class to grade 1 high school girls and I'm unsure about where to pitch the lesson.

I'd appreciate any advice from teachers already teaching to grade 1 high school girls - what sort of things can i expect? I know everyone's different but just some general advice/tips would be a great help!

How many and for how long? If it's the weekend they're likely expecting one of two things: (a) a test-driven test-prep style lesson or (b) conversation-only lessons. It's probably (b). I'd plan a lot of pop songs and multimedia and make certain that I had access to a computer and screen. Remember that apart from a few prep. classes not much serious is expected to happen at schools on Saturdays.

Offline nelg

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Re: Girls high school - Grade 1
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2011, 02:54:27 PM »
I have been teaching at an all girls high school for about a year and a half now and everything already posted rings true for me as well.

You can expect them to be shy at first, but that can fade fast if you approach the class in the right way. Teach to their interests, challenge them and let them know they can ask questions freely. Most of the conversation and best discussions in class has come from random questions students ask me. At first, never make them do anything alone, always with a partner or team. I also rarely make them stand up to read or do any kind of boring, dry presentation. They usually freeze up or don't try. The more creative you can be with how they engage with English the better. I like other people here, do not teach from a book so coming up with a new an exciting lesson every week can be difficult, but well worth the time.

I use a fake money, reward system for my classes and they love it.  A lot of times, when I think things may be below them (too juvenile), they still really enjoy it, so do not hesitate to try.

If you have any more specific questions I would be glad to help. I understand it can be daunting teaching at a high school level.

Offline dwebsterlfc

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Re: Girls high school - Grade 1
« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2011, 02:55:52 PM »
I work at a co-ed but have girl classes and boy classes seperately. The girls will listen and actively participate in the class which is always great. What I would say though is that girls are really scared of getting something wrong or looking like they don't understand something. Therefore often they will just say that they understand when they don't just to save face. Basically they aren't all as good as they make out so don't completely focus on group work otherwise the ones that actually do know everything will just take over and the other kids will not learn anything.


Offline kapteyn

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Lesson Plans Anyone?
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2011, 02:57:47 PM »
Not at all Matt. Its my pleasure.

Grab the Pig Personality Test. It is a great lesson that Hazzy made. I am not sure if he got it from someone else but even though the vocab was tough my first and second graders really liked it. If they finish quickly just shuffle the groups and have them go again. I had the winners raise their hands and then made them all tell the class their personalities. I think everyone appreciated that there wasnt much of a reward this time around and the whole class got a good laugh about it.

Heres the link if the attachment doesnt work. http://prezi.com/ildo2bcncezt/copy-of-copy-of-what-kind-of-person-are-you/
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Offline Juicealicious

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Re: Girls high school - Grade 1
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2011, 09:06:35 AM »
I've been teaching at an all girls high school now for about 2 years. I agree with everything that has been said - shy at first, but they warm up to you, create lessons that cater to their interests, etc. The only problem with the teenage girls is that they love to talk, text, snip their split ends in class, and look in the mirror. My girls are actually pretty good, but lazy. At first I did the reward system where I gave out candy and chocolates, but they started to take advantage of it. I talked to my co-teacher and explained that while the girls behaved well, they weren't learning anything or really putting any effort into the work sheets, etc. The best way to get them to really get involved was to make my class worth something (as our classes are usually worth nothing). Anyways, there is this extra 10% my students have for participation and they ended up giving that to me. So right now, it doesn't matter what I teach, the girls work hard and get it done. I suggest talking to your co if you find the interest level or work ethic is low.

Offline nelg

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Re: Girls high school - Grade 1
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2011, 09:32:09 AM »
Juicealicious, that is really interesting! I wish I had known that at the start of this school year. I started this year by saying that although there are no grades for this class, what we do is up to me. So, if I feel they are not taking the work seriously, the class format will change for them and we will do test prep for the rest of the semester. So far, the looming fear of more studying has made all my classes listen and actively participate in the class.

Are you using any textbook material with your classes, or guided by any other school provided rubric?

Offline rookiecookie

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Uiseong Boys' and Girls' High School Lesson Plans
« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2012, 09:26:42 AM »
This string is for all current and future Uiseong High School guest English teachers through the EPIK program. These lessons were used from September 2011 to August 2013 at the Uiseong Private Boys' High School and the Uiseong Public Girls' High School.

The classes average 30 students and included grade 1, 2, and 3 ages 16 to 19. English proficiency levels varied widely from students with no formal English instruction and students with learning disabilities to students that eventually made it to top national universities and institutions in Seoul, Busan, and Pohang.

Uiseong is located fifty minutes North of Daegu and thirty-five minutes South of Andong. It is affectionately known as the Garlic Capital of South Korea. The town and surrounding villages have about 50,000 inhabitants with the majority living in Uiseong-gun or the town proper. Surrounded by mountains on all sides Uiseong is known to break temperature records during Winter and Summer months. It is a sleepy farm town with most students commuting in from Daegu or Andong.

Lesson 1: Introduction

Greeting
Rules
Icebreaker 1 - "How are you feeling?" snatch game
Icebreaker 2 - Jigsaw puzzle speaking game
English topic survey
Guest teacher introduction http://prezi.com/5jb3fhh75thr/introduction
Review

UPDATES:
Samsung Lions actually won the Korean Series five times.
Current members of Wonder Girls are Min Sun -Ye, Ahn So Hee, Park Ye-Eun, Kim Yoobin, and Woo Hye-Rim.

REACTIONS:
For the Jigsaw puzzle activity it is best to cut out the individual student scripts. It increases the amount of speaking in groups when each member is responsible for their own clues and other team members cannot see each other's clues.
May have to explain or define a "boy band" for students.

LESSON OUTLINE:

Lesson 1: Introduction
Lesson 1a: Welcome back to school!
Lesson 2: Movies
Lesson 2a: Dating Introduction
Lesson 3: Judging Music
Lesson 3a: Dating(b)
Lesson 4: Advertising
Lesson 4a: Dating(c) - Speaking Production
Lesson 5: Review (Ninjas vs. Soldiers)
Lesson 5a: Beauty Introduction
Lesson 5b: Beauty Lecture
Lesson 5c: Beauty Wrap-up
Lesson 6A: Halloween Olympics
Lesson 6B: Thanksgivings Olympics
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 02:21:05 PM by rookiecookie »
Bonne chance and Aloha!

Offline rookiecookie

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Re: Uiseong Boys' and Girls' High School Lesson Plans
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2012, 02:47:43 PM »
The start of the school year for the majority of South Korea is March 1. I started my EPIK contract mid-school year in August, so returning to regular classes after a two-month hiatus (one month of minimal prep Winter camps) was jarring for my students as well as me. I decided to ease them back into the school year with some production-only English games. After six months on the job I finally had a decent grasp on the English proficiency levels of my students.

My sole purpose on the job was for them to speak English, to have them feel comfortable enough to converse, and expose them to my accent and my culture. The following warm-up activities and icebreakers tried to accomplish those goals.

Lesson 1a: Welcome Back to School!

Greeting
Rules - (have them repeat each rule...remind, remind, remind)
Warm-up 1 - Go!
Warm-up 2 - 15
Production - Introductions
Icebreaker 1 - Have you ever?
Icebreaker 2 - Giants, Wizards, and Elves!
Wrap-up

REACTIONS:
Students went crazy during Go! once they got the hang of it. They really liked messing with the guest English teacher with things like "Everyone that is American, Go!" but I got them back with "Everyone with two ears, Go!" or "Everyone that is Korean, Go!"
The game 15 also went over well, but toward the end it was hard to keep all the students' attention.
The Introductions activity could have gone smoother if I gave the student a few more minutes to think about their responses.
Ran out of time and couldn't get to the last two activities, but it is always a good idea to have a few time fillers in your back pocket.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2012, 02:51:33 PM by cheed1978 »
Bonne chance and Aloha!