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  • sheila
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 1480

    • November 23, 2009, 08:32:58 am
    • Gangnamgu, Seoul
Lesson 3: A Rich Father and His Poor Son
« on: March 08, 2012, 10:20:17 am »
This is the thread for Christina H. Kim Middle School English 1 Lesson 3: A Rich Father and His Poor Son. Please share your contributions here. Be sure to check all contributions for spelling and punctuation errors before posting.
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  • Missyjoymel
  • Waygookin

    • 12

    • August 29, 2011, 11:49:35 am
    • Tongyeong, South Korea
Re: Lesson 3: A Rich Father and His Poor Son
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2012, 10:12:27 am »
I found this game on a different site, that might be a good alternative to the p. 45 activity, "Same or Different?" 

Spin the Bottle: This is a spin-off of the classic Spin the Bottle party game. Props include an empty water bottle of any size. Students sit in a circle around a table or on the floor and one student spins the bottle which will eventually point to someone once it has stopped spinning. The spinner must ask the designated person any yes/no question he can think of.

Beginners may not be very inventive and the game can become boring if the same "do you have a pet?" or "do you have a car" question keeps coming up. Teachers can avoid this by asking students to prepare some yes/no questions beforehand so they are not put under pressure when it is their turn to spin.

Once the designated person has answered his question, it becomes his turn to spin the bottle and ask someone else a yes/no question. This game works very well with students who know each other well or who are not shy. Sometimes, the type of question asked can become very daring and funny.


  • imjoanna87
  • Explorer

    • 5

    • March 28, 2012, 09:32:11 am
    • Geoje Island, Korea
Re: Lesson 3: A Rich Father and His Poor Son
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2012, 10:56:44 am »
Thank you for the sharing  :)


  • Rowanteacher
  • Featured Contributor

    • 171

    • October 15, 2010, 07:51:21 am
    • Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
Re: Lesson 3: A Rich Father and His Poor Son
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2012, 11:41:12 am »
Lesson 3 week 1, conversation page.


  • Warra
  • Veteran

    • 139

    • March 05, 2012, 08:10:27 am
    • South Korea
Re: Lesson 3: A Rich Father and His Poor Son
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2012, 01:01:48 pm »
I have combined and altered some stuff I found on Waygook to create two full lessons.
I have also included two lesson plans and a worksheet.
Hope it helps!


Re: Lesson 3: A Rich Father and His Poor Son
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2012, 09:17:51 am »
While reading the conversation on page 44 of the textbook, my students were confused by the use of quotation marks During the Jenny/Munjun dialogue. For example- Jenny: Yes. It says..."Can you help me with this?"

So I made a simple ppt to explain the use of quotation marks.



  • soyoungi
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • May 01, 2012, 08:06:30 am
    • Namyangju
Re: Lesson 3: A Rich Father and His Poor Son
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2012, 11:44:11 am »
I also thought this would be a good activity substitute as well.  I got it off of Dave's ESL website, but it works hand in hand with this lesson. 

It's called the Yes/No Game.  http://www.eslcafe.com/idea/index.cgi?display:1076372780-98565.txt

It's very similar to the spin the bottle game below.  Since my class is quite big, it's hard to get a group of them to sit on the floor or arrange  seats for a large group.  So, instead of that, it was nice to split my class up into 2-4 teams.  I choose a student from each team and have them ask the co-teacher and I "Yes/No" questions.  Yes would be 2 points and No would be 1 point.  After about 3-5 minutes, I would switch the points to No 2 points and Yes 1 point.  I make sure that every student gets a chance to ask a question.

The class gets quite loud because they are trying to help their team out by shouting out questions across the room.  To make sure they don't get to rowdy, you can probably say you will deduct a point to the team that is too loud.

My class loved the game.  Even the students that weren't active in class were able to ask a question.

This game can last for 10-15 minutes.  Might be good to use at the end of the lesson.

Cheers!

I found this game on a different site, that might be a good alternative to the p. 45 activity, "Same or Different?" 

Spin the Bottle: This is a spin-off of the classic Spin the Bottle party game. Props include an empty water bottle of any size. Students sit in a circle around a table or on the floor and one student spins the bottle which will eventually point to someone once it has stopped spinning. The spinner must ask the designated person any yes/no question he can think of.

Beginners may not be very inventive and the game can become boring if the same "do you have a pet?" or "do you have a car" question keeps coming up. Teachers can avoid this by asking students to prepare some yes/no questions beforehand so they are not put under pressure when it is their turn to spin.

Once the designated person has answered his question, it becomes his turn to spin the bottle and ask someone else a yes/no question. This game works very well with students who know each other well or who are not shy. Sometimes, the type of question asked can become very daring and funny.