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Saying Goodbye in Different Languages
« on: December 10, 2010, 02:23:14 pm »
So one of my teachers asked me to go over a page in the textbook covering saying good-bye in different languages. The speaking section in the lesson focuses on saying good-bye so it connects to that (MS English 1 Mark Brown in case anyone is wondering)

So I whipped up a small video clip with audio clips of people saying the expressions they have in the textbook. Now, I know in German is auf wiedersehen but in the book, it just has wiedersehen. And since I didn't feel like explaining to my students and teachers that this is wrong (I'm not the German teacher and I don't speak it) so I just found a clip that I could easily edit the 'auf' out. Edit: Nevermind!! ^^;; I was wrong

Languages: German, Russian, Italian, Hindi, Swedish, and Chinese/Mandarin. You could really use this for any school (elementary, middle, and high school) depending on the lesson plan.

Enjoy folks!
« Last Edit: December 11, 2010, 12:30:57 pm by raintenshi »


Re: Saying Goodbye in Different Languages
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2010, 02:58:43 pm »
Wiedersehen isn't wrong.  :)


  • Dantastical
  • Waygookin

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    • September 16, 2010, 07:46:06 am
    • Pohang, South Korea
Re: Saying Goodbye in Different Languages
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2010, 03:59:19 pm »
"Wiedersehen" is just a shorter way to say "Auf Wiedersehen". It's similar to saying "Bye" instead of "Goodbye"


Re: Saying Goodbye in Different Languages
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2010, 06:51:20 pm »
Weidersehen is just less formal.  Like when Korean's say annyeong and skip the ha/ka/kye seyo.

Even more informally/common are tschüss, or ciao.


Re: Saying Goodbye in Different Languages
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2010, 12:30:03 pm »
And this is why I didn't say anything to my teacher ^^;; Not a German speaker or teacher. hahah. Thanks for the added info