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  • sheila
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    • November 23, 2009, 08:32:58 am
    • Gangnamgu, Seoul
Lesson 9: If I Were You
« on: March 06, 2013, 03:11:00 pm »
This is a thread for any lesson material for 이재영/Jay Robert Fraser (천재 교육) Middle School English 2 Lesson 9: If I Were You. Please share your contributions here. Be sure to explain exactly what you are posting and please do not post multi-level materials in this thread. Also, any review lessons or materials should be posted in the review section for this grade.  Best of luck in your lesson planning!
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  • pjblake
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    • February 24, 2013, 08:47:39 am
    • Gwangju, South Korea
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Re: Lesson 9: If I Were You
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2013, 02:45:48 pm »
This is a complete lesson for Chapter 9, Part I.

I will try something different, since the key expressions for the chapter are pretty boring.  The lesson covers the conditional "if" e.g. What if you had a $1 million?  What would you do?

Warm the class up by having them listen to If I Had a Million Dollars by Barenaked Ladies.  Have them write as many things the singer would do with a million dollars as they can.  This is a simple listening activity that takes the place of the Listen & Speak sections in the textbook.

Continue explaining the conditional "if," then show the students a video of The Ants & The Grasshopper.  After the video, do a few comprehension check questions, then the main event.  Have the students remake the story from the Grasshopper's perspective.  This is done through a comic strip, where they draw the story rather than write it.  Advanced classes can include dialog (and should be encouraged to), lower levels can simply draw out their ideas.

The attachments include a Lesson Plan, PPT Presentation, Blank Comic Strip, and I included a Battleship game in the PPT, just in case the comic strip idea doesn't work.

Some slides have notes on them; more information available there.  For the videos, I've included links to them on the slides in the PPT.


Re: Lesson 9: If I Were You
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2013, 02:59:27 pm »
Attached is a powerpoint that covers the Grammatical Functions (Are/Have you? Are you interested in ...? & I'm (not) interested in ...) of Lesson 9. My coteachers will cover the If, would Form, so I'm left with the Listen & Speak material.

Anyway, this is a modified version of the powerpoint I made last year and posted in that huge unorganized thread of this book's teacher-made materials. I'd like to think that my ppt skills have improved since then.  :wink:

This is rather boring material. To jazz it up for my students I've thrown in some slides with pictures of myself and my cute nieces. Delete them if you want, or keep them in, but you'll probably at least want to change my names from the slides. Just a heads up!
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  • pjblake
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    • February 24, 2013, 08:47:39 am
    • Gwangju, South Korea
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Re: Lesson 9: If I Were You
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2013, 02:59:10 pm »
This is a complete lesson for Chapter 9, Part II.  It covers Listen & Speak 2.

Just like aklimkewicz said, this is a rather boring chapter.  I'm actually reusing a lesson for Grade 3 (using this same book series) which covers the expression "Do you enjoy...?"  Since "Are you interested in ..." basically means the same thing as "Do you like/enjoy..."  I decided to go easy on myself for a change.

Quickly go over "Are you interested" as another way to ask "Do you like" and give them examples on how to answer this question.  I made a point to show how the response "I'm not interested in A, but I am interested in B" should have an emphasis on the word "am."  The book doesn't mention this, and gives the response as "I'm not interested in A, but I'm interested in B" which doesn't really sound right to me as a native speaker...if you're going to go through the trouble of saying all that, you would make a point to emphasis what it is that you're actually interested in.

Sorry, grammar tangent over.  There is a Card Matching Game, where the students go around the room asking the target expressions in order to find one of each of 9 different activity cards.  I also re-made the Battleship Board I included in my Part I lesson above (I didn't end up using it last week); you can use this to reinforce the key expressions if you haven't already done in the previous lesson.  FYI my students (a low level class) really enjoyed the game, once they understood the rules.

As always, make sure to save the audio file in the same directory as the PPT and everything will work fine.