Read 3265 times

  • sheila
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 1480

    • November 23, 2009, 08:32:58 am
    • Gangnamgu, Seoul
Lesson 11: A Look Inside Traditional Korean Life
« on: March 06, 2013, 03:12:05 pm »
This is a thread for any lesson material for 이재영/Jay Robert Fraser (천재 교육) Middle School English 2 Lesson 11: A Look Inside Traditional Korean Life. Please share your contributions here. Be sure to explain exactly what you are posting and please do not post multi-level materials in this thread. Also, any review lessons or materials should be posted in the review section for this grade.  Best of luck in your lesson planning!
Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard!
www.freerice.com


Re: Lesson 11: A Look Inside Traditional Korean Life
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2013, 11:49:50 am »
I am brand new to Waygook and to teaching ESL; I'm in my second week.  Thing is I have my open class already next Friday and it's taken me an age to discern any direction from the Teacher's Guide for Lesson 11, Grade 2 Middle School.  I'm not getting much help from any of my 4 co teachers.  At this point I understand that the objectives for the L&S 1&2 are "I have to go now, Why don't you...and I'd love to" while the "subject" is Korean Traditional Life.  I've done one lesson which didn't exactly tank but really wasn't interesting.  I teach a supplementary and I get activities, games, worksheets, etc, but if anyone can help with ideas specific to this lesson I would really, really appreciate it!

Thanks.


  • pjblake
  • Adventurer

    • 70

    • February 24, 2013, 08:47:39 am
    • Gwangju, South Korea
    more
Re: Lesson 11: A Look Inside Traditional Korean Life
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2013, 12:54:23 pm »
Here is a complete lesson for Chapter 11, Part I.

I'm responsible for the Listen & Speak sections of the Textbook.  This chapter has some rather uninteresting phrases, which I'm planning to cover in one lesson next week.  This week I decided to delve into the "cultural" aspect of this chapter, with a lesson about the Korean flag and symbolism.  Some KTs may find this lesson a little too off-topic, so I spun it  as teaching the class how to talk about their culture to English-speakers (which is actually a useful thing to teach them, as opposed to "I have to go now" or "I must be off").

This presentation is a mish-mash of numerous Korean Flag PPTs on this site, though I mainly borrowed material from capebretonbarbarian, daveb, and Jaeesson Teacha.  Major thanks to the OPs for this presentation!

At the end of the presentation, the class gets to design their own flag for a hypothetical unified Korean country.  Lower-levels can just design and draw their flags; higher-levels can explain what the symbols and colors mean or represent.  If you go the class presentation route (which wouldn't be a bad idea), this lesson should fill the full 45-minutes.

I provided a lot of background information on the symbols and flags presented in the PPT.  Look at the comments section on certain slides; more information available there and in the lesson plan.


  • jlehmke
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • March 02, 2011, 10:54:48 am
    • Seongnam
Re: Lesson 11: A Look Inside Traditional Korean Life
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2013, 08:42:02 am »
Think & Write section and then another short writing exercise I added.


  • pjblake
  • Adventurer

    • 70

    • February 24, 2013, 08:47:39 am
    • Gwangju, South Korea
    more
Re: Lesson 11: A Look Inside Traditional Korean Life
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2013, 12:59:50 pm »
Here is a complete lesson for Chapter 11, Part II.  It covers Listen & Speak 2, "Why don't you ..." and "I have to go now."

I combined the two L&S sections into a single lesson.  This textbook has covered giving advice and making plans, which are the two uses for a phrase like "Why don't you ..." so I didn't feel the need to spend a lot of time on this one.  And the other phrases for goodbye also don't warrant a lot of explanation.

Do the Listen & Speak 2 section, then do several rounds of Pass the Pencil, Angry Birds style.  I included the Angry Birds theme song in the attachments for this activity.  Afterwards, there is another listening/speaking activity.  Play the song Hello Goodbye by The Beatles after handing out the lyrics sheet to the class.  They will listen to the song, and then they have to fill in the blanks using one or more of the key expressions from the lesson.  The only rule is they can't use the word "goodbye."  They should be encouraged to think of their own phrase for "goodbye," but write the three phrases on the board so the lower level students can participate as well.  When everyone's finished, have a few groups present their new verse.  I offer extra incentives if the group will sing their verse in tune with the song.

This lesson may run a little short, so have a back up activity like Pictionary, Hot Seat, etc. ready just in case.

As always, save the audio files in the same directory as the PPT and everything should work fine.  Some slides have comments; more information available there and in the lesson plan.


  • ramasatti
  • Waygookin

    • 17

    • May 24, 2011, 07:50:13 am
    • Yeoju-gun, South Korea
Re: Lesson 11: A Look Inside Traditional Korean Life
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2013, 10:21:50 am »
Here is a complete lesson for Chapter 11, Part I.

I'm responsible for the Listen & Speak sections of the Textbook.  This chapter has some rather uninteresting phrases, which I'm planning to cover in one lesson next week.  This week I decided to delve into the "cultural" aspect of this chapter, with a lesson about the Korean flag and symbolism.  Some KTs may find this lesson a little too off-topic, so I spun it  as teaching the class how to talk about their culture to English-speakers (which is actually a useful thing to teach them, as opposed to "I have to go now" or "I must be off").

This presentation is a mish-mash of numerous Korean Flag PPTs on this site, though I mainly borrowed material from capebretonbarbarian, daveb, and Jaeesson Teacha.  Major thanks to the OPs for this presentation!

At the end of the presentation, the class gets to design their own flag for a hypothetical unified Korean country.  Lower-levels can just design and draw their flags; higher-levels can explain what the symbols and colors mean or represent.  If you go the class presentation route (which wouldn't be a bad idea), this lesson should fill the full 45-minutes.

I provided a lot of background information on the symbols and flags presented in the PPT.  Look at the comments section on certain slides; more information available there and in the lesson plan.

I, myself, found this very interesting and it was a lot of fun. Plus, the activity at the end was fantastic! The kids loved it. Thanks!