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  • matrim44
  • Waygookin

    • 17

    • September 06, 2010, 10:07:54 am
    • Gangwon-do Jeongseon-gun Hambaek
Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« on: February 22, 2011, 12:40:39 pm »
Here's my first lesson for the grade 3 book

Again, a lot of the stuff is not explicit in the ppt. It requires a lot of talking, but I think it's pretty self-explanatory. Just finished it today.

For those of you interested in contributing, please post stuff asap, so I don't work from scratch on the same stuff. Thanks again for everyone's help
« Last Edit: March 03, 2011, 02:24:41 pm by sheila »


  • ajminh
  • Adventurer

    • 50

    • February 28, 2011, 12:19:13 am
    • Daegu, Korea
Re: J.L. Haas
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2011, 11:30:09 pm »
Matrim, your first lesson for Middle, grade 3 looks great. This is my first time teaching classes of this size and age level. This definitely helps me feel at ease. Once I finish my future lesson plans I will definitely post them here.


  • knickknack
  • Waygookin

    • 13

    • March 05, 2010, 08:50:26 am
    • South Korea
Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2011, 12:33:22 pm »
I made one short powerpoint to go with this lesson. It's basically a slight variation on the Excuses doc. previously posted so feel free to use it or not.


  • banana
  • Waygookin

    • 23

    • September 07, 2010, 08:44:08 am
    • Busan
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2011, 09:46:21 am »
Hey there,

Just beginning to plan my lesson for this one. I have to make it last two weeks so I'm filling it out with some information about schools around the world. If anyone is doing the same I've just come across a great site http://ethemes.missouri.edu/themes/1809 which has 'day in the life' info for students from loads of different countries. Will post completed lessons when finished!


  • Florence7
  • Adventurer

    • 69

    • October 28, 2010, 01:08:53 pm
    • Korea
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2011, 09:52:14 am »
Hi,
Please could you post the ppt and doc as 2003 - my computer is ancient and I can't access the ppt.x formats.
ta!

ps Thrilled we're starting this. I used book one and two last year so have resources from last year to post. 3rd grade is new to me..


  • bemfarle
  • Waygookin

    • 21

    • March 03, 2011, 08:25:30 am
    • Busan
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2011, 10:19:14 am »
...Dynamic Korea...

I arrived at school today at 8:30 am only to find out that second period, I was to start teaching a high-level grade 3 English class and use the text book. I just want to throw out a giant THANK you!!! to the posts here. I couldn't check the docx documents because I'm only using office 2003 at school :S but the ppt of Excuses was perfect. My 'high-level' kids aren't really all that high level, so I had to change some of the wording.. Regardless, I'm going to post my very last minute lesson plan in hopes that it will in turn, help one of you out, or provide guidance to some other teachers. Please note that its not all that exciting.. I didn't have time to really think of a game, but overall it was very well received by the students and teachers especially.

Attached:

Lesson plan (very brief)
comic picture (for introduction)
Video link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbEQT0y2JQI


  • sheila
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 1480

    • November 23, 2009, 08:32:58 am
    • Gangnamgu, Seoul
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2011, 10:30:29 am »
Ginger~ Check out this thread for converting files... it will be a life saver if you don't have Windows 2007.

http://waygook.org/index.php/topic,1208.0.html
Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard!
www.freerice.com


  • Florence7
  • Adventurer

    • 69

    • October 28, 2010, 01:08:53 pm
    • Korea
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2011, 02:55:52 pm »
Thanks Sheila. Am on it :-)


Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2011, 12:02:35 pm »
First time posting, and particularly lazy when it comes to explaining things but hopefully this will help some people. Ive divided the lesson into 2 parts - this part is making excuses.
The lesson (unposted parts) also incorporates about 10 minutes of organising teams for the 1st semester so may possibly run short. The game is the central part of the lesson and has perhaps overdetailed instructions, though I hope to use this format of game regularly and won't have to spend time every other lesson on this sort of thing.

Requires a bit of work, especially the printing and cutting of cards, anyway most welcome to ask questions if things arent self explanatory


  • banana
  • Waygookin

    • 23

    • September 07, 2010, 08:44:08 am
    • Busan
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2011, 12:44:19 pm »
Just finished my ppt for this one. Again it's two lessons worth on one powerpoint, and the start is just for making a points system and seating chart so ignore :)


  • samuelmp
  • Adventurer

    • 55

    • November 09, 2010, 09:54:30 am
    • Seoul, Korea
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2011, 01:12:28 pm »
Just made a super mario game for this lesson, Kids love it, been a great hit, im working also on a modified ppt from the first lesson posted here to show the students the vocabulary to use before we play the game as the game is meant to be a review of the lesson.


  • samuelmp
  • Adventurer

    • 55

    • November 09, 2010, 09:54:30 am
    • Seoul, Korea
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2011, 08:23:17 am »
here is a ppt to go along with the super mario game


  • strawberry
  • Expert Waygook

    • 533

    • February 17, 2011, 10:08:30 am
    • Gyeongbuk, South Korea
    more
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2011, 11:30:24 am »
Hey guys, my kids were super tired today so I had a hard time teaching them ANYTHING.  I have to do 4 lessons on each topic (2 times a week for 2 weeks) and my kids have to stay at school for a study session until 10pm every night :( so for my last lesson I think they should just chill out.  So I'm having them play an easy game of charades.

 My classes are in teams already, so I will have one member of the first team come up and pick a card. 

I will read the "favor" on the card (e.g. Can I borrow your bicycle").  The student has to then mime the excuse (I'm sorry, but I only have one wheel) and his/her team has 3 chances to give the correct excuse for points.  Team with the most points is the winner.  There are also 5 bonus cards with points for "free".

So just print out the cards and laminate if you want to use them again. :)

@Samuelmp thanks for the mario game - it'll definitely wake them up a bit!!


  • strawberry
  • Expert Waygook

    • 533

    • February 17, 2011, 10:08:30 am
    • Gyeongbuk, South Korea
    more
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2011, 11:36:12 am »
Just made a super mario game for this lesson, Kids love it, been a great hit, im working also on a modified ppt from the first lesson posted here to show the students the vocabulary to use before we play the game as the game is meant to be a review of the lesson.

There is no hyperlink to go back to the "mushroom" page when they got the wrong answer... or does it not matter? (Is is just like review lesson - they can be "helped" to get the right answer?"   

The mario takes you to the "points" page.   but if they're wrong they don't get anything, right?


Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2011, 12:12:10 pm »
Quote
The mario takes you to the "points" page.   but if they're wrong they don't get anything, right?
If one team gets the answer wrong then usually the question goes to the next team (so you need to know the answers in advance)


  • samuelmp
  • Adventurer

    • 55

    • November 09, 2010, 09:54:30 am
    • Seoul, Korea
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2011, 08:51:22 am »
Quote
The mario takes you to the "points" page.   but if they're wrong they don't get anything, right?
If one team gets the answer wrong then usually the question goes to the next team (so you need to know the answers in advance)


Yeah you need to let another team have a chance to guess, if no team can get it then you should probably help them hit the points slide see how much points they missed and then go back to the mushrooms.


  • strawberry
  • Expert Waygook

    • 533

    • February 17, 2011, 10:08:30 am
    • Gyeongbuk, South Korea
    more
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #16 on: March 10, 2011, 09:06:41 am »
Aah ok, thanks!!! :)


  • cswehla
  • Adventurer

    • 55

    • March 03, 2011, 09:57:44 am
    • Busan
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #17 on: March 10, 2011, 10:20:39 am »
Here's a worksheet for making excuses I made. You can provide the answer key for the low-level students and take away the answer key for the advanced students.

There's also a "puzzle" activity I found on ESLprintables.com. I'm going to change it to be a little easier for my lower level classes.


Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #18 on: March 10, 2011, 10:41:08 am »
Just finished my ppt for this one. Again it's two lessons worth on one powerpoint, and the start is just for making a points system and seating chart so ignore :)

banana, I've been using this lesson and it has been going great! Thanks so much for posting it you've made my week much easier and both the students and teachers seem to really like this lesson :)


  • Aadi
  • Veteran

    • 78

    • September 10, 2010, 02:27:20 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Lesson 1: Schools Around the World
« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2011, 12:33:09 pm »
Like many of you, I teach two 45-minute periods for each textbook lesson.  With third graders I exhaust the first period belaboring Listen and Talk and In Conversation and spend the second period on some related game-type thing. 

You probably don't need my help with the first half (hint:  use Worksheet 1-1).  Here's my PPT for the second period featuring Mr. Stickman's Dangerous Hangmannish Walk with words from the previous class and a Lucky Wheel (thanks Rufus) game belaboring asking for permission and making excuses.  My students are generally low-level and are terrified of speaking, so this is more than enough material to fill my time.