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  • Brian
  • Featured Contributor

    • 735

    • September 19, 2006, 01:07:56 pm
    • Pittsburgh / Jeollanam-do
Why should you pick an English name?
« on: March 20, 2009, 03:43:02 pm »
My school separated 1st grade into high and low levels (ugh), and the stuff I planned for mixed classes was way too hard.  I threw together this for my first lesson with them, though you could probably work it in whenever.  Most students didn't know how to write their names in English, and so I wanted to teach that plus how to write stuff like cities and food in English, too.  For the second half of class I attached an activity I've done before (greatly simplified). 

1. Warm up for a few minutes with whatever you normally do. 

2. Pass out the worksheet, which on the one side has a romanization chart stolen off Wikipedia.  It's self-explanatory, but you'll need to clear up the "ㅇ," which is written "ng" only when the final consonant.  So 여수 is Yeosu, not Ngyeosu.  The other stuff---such as g/k, b/p in the final position---can just be done on a case-by-case basis individually.  The warm-up plus writing their names, three friends, their hometown, and their favorite Korean food took up about 20-25 minutes.  Add or subtract things to your liking, but for me these questions were plenty.

3. Then I did the "Find someone who" activity.  Basically students ask each other these questions and try to find someone with an answer that's on their paper.  For example, one student will ask another "What's your favorite color?" and if the student says "My favorite color is blue" they'll write their name (their newly-learned ENGLISH-spelled name) on the line.  This is a good activity in and of itself, and you can have the students do this until the rest of the period. 

4. The bingo game.  I made this up only because with higher-level students I do the "find someone who" activity and it ends with about 15 minutes left.  If you want to do it, make sure the students only write one name per line on their sheet, and have ten different people.  They write the names on their bingo card.  You read out a sentence, they find the name written there, then cross it off the bingo card.

* For some reason the charts don't show up on the word document for me, but if you click "print preview" you'll see them, and if you print the documents they're there.
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  • Brian
  • Featured Contributor

    • 735

    • September 19, 2006, 01:07:56 pm
    • Pittsburgh / Jeollanam-do
Re: Easy MS - Writing names in English.
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2009, 02:45:26 pm »
Cleaning out the computer at work, and attaching this worksheet as well. 

I used to teach students how to write their names in English, but it's not as simple as looking at a chart.  There are exceptions regarding names, and people often use an older system.  They'll write it as it appears on their passport, if they have one.  Even names of cities and foods are written in a couple different ways, even though there ought to be one accepted standard.  Nonetheless, should you want them to review how to write Korean in English---most useful for places and food, IMO---here you go.  Charts stolen from Wikipedia, if I'm not mistaken.
In Korea from 2005 - 2010, not in Korea now.  Please contact an active moderator for quick answers to your questions.

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  • merle
  • Veteran

    • 123

    • May 08, 2008, 08:04:02 am
Re: Easy MS - Writing names in English.
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2009, 11:38:31 am »
Good lesson.  I think it's important for kids to be able to spell their name both in 한글 and English. 

I had a similar lesson here: http://waygook.org/index.php?topic=541.0

But in that one I had students make an acrostic name poem, which is a great activity if you have creatively-inclined students.  Even better if you have the space to display them, and students are able to put the finishing touches on their papers.  However, the display idea might not work for those of you who teach 1000s of students.


Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2011, 12:43:48 pm »
I gave this to my kids at the start of the semester as reasoning for why it's not a bad idea to have an English name. Granted we are almost finished for the year, but I'm sure somebody could use this next semester.

Here is the link to the Google Doc if you would prefer that over downloading:

https://docs.google.com/present/edit?id=0ARUL8tan9ZGKZGM3MmJ3amdfODg0ZHh3Zms5ZDg&hl=en_US&authkey=CLXTkPYL

Cheers!


  • korn25
  • Waygookin

    • 11

    • June 22, 2011, 10:07:57 am
    • Daegu
Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2011, 10:52:32 am »
I do get where your coming from but do not agree with this western name requirement!
It's like Korean's demanding us to change our names to  suit their laziness. I understand that the use of their full name makes life difficult; perhaps explaining that it is difficult (ask them to remember your full name for example) and seeing if they'd be happy to compromise; called by first or last name/preferred combination is a more tactful way of going about it.
Conversely, if the children like having a foreign name the above is obviously not a problem. I imagine it is quite fun being able to choose your name. I've seen some very entertaining/bizarre ones, but think pushing it on them is wrong.
 Don't agree with the slide that suggests it makes them look more intelligent and your name does strongly correlate with identity; look at the slave trade history if you disagree. It's almost a superior complex move; demanding them to change their birth name and thus, if not suggested by them,  is very disrespectful in my books.
친구


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2011, 11:01:09 am »
I make English names for fun. My students want me to know all of their names, but there are more than 900 of them. I told them it is very hard to remember a lot of names. It is even harder, because a lot of students have the same names,  Su Jung for example. If they pick a unique English name, only they will have it and I won't forget it. In my winter camp, 57 girls came to camp and 50 of them picked English names. All 50 students still use their English names and want me to refer to them as such. Victoria, for example, refuses to have me call her by any other name. I don't do it because I am lazy, but rather to help create a more unique identity for them in my classroom. No one is forced to pick and English name. They don't even have to use it. Most of them like to and I offered them a chance to make me a Korean name.


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2011, 11:28:49 am »
I do get where your coming from but do not agree with this western name requirement!
It's like Korean's demanding us to change our names to  suit their laziness. I understand that the use of their full name makes life difficult; perhaps explaining that it is difficult (ask them to remember your full name for example) and seeing if they'd be happy to compromise; called by first or last name/preferred combination is a more tactful way of going about it.
Conversely, if the children like having a foreign name the above is obviously not a problem. I imagine it is quite fun being able to choose your name. I've seen some very entertaining/bizarre ones, but think pushing it on them is wrong.
 Don't agree with the slide that suggests it makes them look more intelligent and your name does strongly correlate with identity; look at the slave trade history if you disagree. It's almost a superior complex move; demanding them to change their birth name and thus, if not suggested by them,  is very disrespectful in my books.

Completely agree.

Your name is your name. To somehow imply that it's not good enough, ever, seems very negative.


  • robhip
  • Explorer

    • 9

    • June 08, 2011, 08:07:13 am
    • seoul
Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2011, 12:46:25 pm »
I also have them create names simply for fun. I don't demand that they make it "an English name". If they want to be called Jun, that's fine, if they want to be called hot dog, that's fine too. I don't think people have trouble remembering names. No one has a problem remembering Mao Zedong or Ichiro Suzuki. People will remember your name if they want to remember it. Pressuring people to go by Grace or Alice is kind of insulting. But I feel like a lot of Asians want an English name because it is something they've created and it makes them feel special. So the option is there if they want it in my class.


  • 501reasons
  • Adventurer

    • 32

    • June 24, 2011, 12:57:57 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2011, 01:31:11 pm »
i only have my students choose an english name during camps.  even then i let them be creative.  i've had a big show, toto, soju and so on.  i was given a korean name in my korean class.  i like being called by it just as much as my english name.  i will answer to either! lol  i don't agree with the slide that having a western name makes you look smarter. 
i also still have students asking to be called by their english name.  when i hand out worksheets, they ask if they can write down their english name.  i tell them either one is fine.


  • ferdo06
  • Waygookin

    • 14

    • July 01, 2011, 08:04:30 am
    • South Korea
Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2011, 02:04:16 pm »
i tried to learn all of my kids names but there are over 700 of them! i even had them come up to the computer and type it for me. unfortunately, i accidently deleted those files so i have nothing now. i think i will use the english name ppt and request english names even if they dont want to. it would be a lot easier on me for summer camp.


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2011, 11:40:32 am »
I usually have between 100-150 students a session.  I only use their Korean names.  There are a couple of reasons for this...

1)  As others have said, your name is your identity.  I don't think anyone should have to change their name to fit a language.  That's just my personal opinion.

2)  If my students use English names, I only remember their English name.  In my first year, I had an adult student named "Frank".  To this day,  I still don't know his real name.  This became problematic when I called his home to invite him somewhere, and his wife answered the phone.  I had to ask if "Frank" was there.  Needless to say, his wife was rather confused.

With large classes, I always struggle to remember names.  I'm not good with names, Korean or English.  So, I have a few techniques I use.  The first is simplly to have the students make 'nameplates' that they put on their desks every class.  These are made by folding a piece of paper into a triangle (fold it in half, open, and then fold the edges to the middle, then bring the 1st and 4th sections together to form a triangle).  If a student doesn't bring their old nameplate, it takes 30 seconds to make a new one, so there's no excuse for not having one.

Also, I use seating plans.  I have set up an Excel spread sheet that allows me to enter a class list and then randomly assigns each student to a different seat every class (I want my students to practice speaking with different people each class, rather than just having similar conversations with their friends).  This was a bit of work to set up originally, but now that it's done (I have a few different sheets for the 3-4 different classrooms I teach in), now I just have to copy and paste a student list into the sheet and I'm good to go.  Whether you want to randomly generate seating arrangements every class or not, a seating plan allows you to call on students by name, and is also a very time efficient way of taking attendance.  I also use it to make notes about bonus points, deductions, problems, etc., which can easily be transferred to my grade book later on.

Just a couple of 'tricks' I use to help me remember my students' Korean names.  For the students I see twice a week, I usually know most of their names by midterms, but the students I only see once a week...well, I do my best.   :laugh:


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2011, 08:20:11 pm »
I think this is being read into a little too much. I'm not trying to destroy their identity. To equate my lesson plan to the days of the slave trade is totally out of line.

The point I was making was that a name is just a name. I don't really believe it's essential to your identity ("a rose by any other name...")- you are the same person at the end of the day. If you believe that you are not- stick with one name. No big deal.

I do think it's worldly to have many names. It shows that you understand other cultures. I was always excited to pick French and Spanish names when I studied the language and my teacher didn't know me by any other name. Nobody was hurt.

It's not a requirement. The kids were happy to pick names. Nobody got upset. If a kid didn't want to use an English name I would have been fine with it- but it didn't come up.


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #12 on: July 03, 2011, 08:23:34 pm »
The international language of business is English. If it were Korean, we would all be learning Korean and picking Korean names. Comparing it to the slave trade is way out of line, bud. Nobody was upset- the kids were happy to pick names.

I do get where your coming from but do not agree with this western name requirement!
It's like Korean's demanding us to change our names to  suit their laziness. I understand that the use of their full name makes life difficult; perhaps explaining that it is difficult (ask them to remember your full name for example) and seeing if they'd be happy to compromise; called by first or last name/preferred combination is a more tactful way of going about it.
Conversely, if the children like having a foreign name the above is obviously not a problem. I imagine it is quite fun being able to choose your name. I've seen some very entertaining/bizarre ones, but think pushing it on them is wrong.
 Don't agree with the slide that suggests it makes them look more intelligent and your name does strongly correlate with identity; look at the slave trade history if you disagree. It's almost a superior complex move; demanding them to change their birth name and thus, if not suggested by them,  is very disrespectful in my books.


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2011, 09:06:05 pm »
Who here, when attending foreign language class in school, were expected to adopt a name in the target language?

I was.

If anything, it does seem to create an environment more focused on the language.  Then again, English is in the special position of being an international language and lingua franca.  So, English is used so much between non-native speakers this may be rendered useless.
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #14 on: July 03, 2011, 09:21:50 pm »
Who here, when attending foreign language class in school, were expected to adopt a name in the target language?

I was.



Who here was told we would seem 'more worldly' and more likely to make friends if we abandoned our actual names?

I'm all for fun, but that ppt makes some implications that are fairly ridiculous.


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2011, 09:34:02 pm »
The ppt says "It's OK to have TWO names".

Nobody is telling them to "abandon" their actual names.


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2011, 09:47:39 pm »
The ppt says "It's OK to have TWO names".

Nobody is telling them to "abandon" their actual names.

Just seems like you're telling them that having a Korean name might mean they're not 'worldly' or won't make friends or do business as easily.

Actually, that's precisely what it says:

"If you have an English name, it means you studied English language and Western culture. It shows how worldly you are!"
"Having an English name makes it easier to make Western friends, too!"


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #17 on: July 03, 2011, 09:54:55 pm »
The international language of business is English. If it were Korean, we would all be learning Korean and picking Korean names.



Surely you don't actually believe that, do you?

Or do you just mean in a classroom setting?


  • flasyb
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1901

    • November 30, 2010, 12:10:03 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #18 on: July 04, 2011, 12:17:59 am »
I do get where your coming from but do not agree with this western name requirement!
It's like Korean's demanding us to change our names to  suit their laziness. I understand that the use of their full name makes life difficult; perhaps explaining that it is difficult (ask them to remember your full name for example) and seeing if they'd be happy to compromise; called by first or last name/preferred combination is a more tactful way of going about it.
Conversely, if the children like having a foreign name the above is obviously not a problem. I imagine it is quite fun being able to choose your name. I've seen some very entertaining/bizarre ones, but think pushing it on them is wrong.
 Don't agree with the slide that suggests it makes them look more intelligent and your name does strongly correlate with identity; look at the slave trade history if you disagree. It's almost a superior complex move; demanding them to change their birth name and thus, if not suggested by them,  is very disrespectful in my books.

Completely agree.

Your name is your name. To somehow imply that it's not good enough, ever, seems very negative.

From the article/slide show and the original post, I didn't get that Korean names "aren't good enough." I don't think anyone is seriously suggesting that. I feel that you've exaggerated that idea for your own purpose of disagreeing.

However, I do think that memorising your students' Korean names is the best way to go. Not least because if you want to talk about a student with another teacher outside of class then their Korean name is the name you need to use.

Also, the kids seem to respond better if you make friends with them a little and use their Korean names (although I teach high school and it might be different with younger students).

I get the idea that giving students an English name gives them the opportunity to take on another persona and speak more during class but that's just not realistic in my situation as I only see students once a week and they already hate English or see my classes as useless (no say in exams/tests) for the most part. The best way for me to get a response is to learn their real names and I think that will always be the best way. I don't think that giving English names is necessarily lazy but I do think that learning Korean names is more difficult but ultimately more beneficial all round.
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

We are not "guests" in Korea. Korea didn't invite us over for Pimms in the garden. We are paid employees.


Re: Why should you pick an English name?
« Reply #19 on: July 04, 2011, 08:26:29 am »

From the article/slide show and the original post, I didn't get that Korean names "aren't good enough." I don't think anyone is seriously suggesting that. I feel that you've exaggerated that idea for your own purpose of disagreeing.


That's fine. You disagree and your response to my and others disagreement is that we're just exaggerating so we can disagree.

That's quite the astute rebuttal.

What's the name of this thread again? Shall I copy and paste slides from the PPT again?

The OP may not seriously think that, but that's the message he/she is sending with a lesson like this. Either inadvertently or purposely they're stating that having an English name will qualify them in a positive manner, whereas not having one may make things more difficult.

Again, as mentioned, I'm all for fun and having English names if the kids want them. I just see a problem with the suggestion that having an English name will help kids 'make friends easier' among other things. Comes off as a bit negative and ethnocentric and as people working with impressionable children, I think that's the last thing we should be shooting for.

But that's just me.